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Sveen, Josefin, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5523-8126
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Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Holm, M., Weber Falk, M., Alvariza, A., Sveen, J. & Kreicbergs, U. (2023). How parents of dependent children reason about their partner's impending death due to cancer. Death Studies, 47(1), 105-110
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How parents of dependent children reason about their partner's impending death due to cancer
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2023 (English)In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores how bereaved parents with dependent children reasoned about their partner's impending death due to cancer. Questionnaires were used to collect data from 42 cancer-bereaved parents of dependent children in Sweden. The results showed that most of the parents had thought, at least once, that death would be best for their partner's own sake. A few parents had also thought that it would be best for everyone if their partner died. Many parents had a wish to keep up hope, no matter what. However, living with a partner with advanced illness and dependent children was described as extremely stressful.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9272 (URN)10.1080/07481187.2021.1992807 (DOI)000719624300001 ()34787534 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-12-09 Created: 2021-12-09 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Melin-Johansson, C., Sveen, J., Lövgren, M. & Udo, C. (2022). A third of dying patients do not have end-of-life discussions with a physician: A nationwide registry study. Palliative & Supportive Care, 20(3), 357-362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A third of dying patients do not have end-of-life discussions with a physician: A nationwide registry study
2022 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to explore the proportion of adult patients and next-of-kin who had end-of-life (EOL) discussions and associated factors.

METHOD: A retrospective nationwide registry study was reported with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. All patients in Sweden in hospitals, nursing homes, own homes, community, and palliative care units during 2015-2017 and their next-of-kin were included. Data were reported to the register by healthcare staff, based on diseased patients' records regarding their last days of life, and were voluntary. Descriptive statistics illustrated the proportion of patients/next-of-kin who had EOL discussions and logistic regressions were used to examine associated factors.

RESULTS: About half of the patients (46%) did have an EOL discussion, but a third (32%) did not. Associated factors of those who did not have an EOL discussion were dementia (48.5%) or stroke (47.5%), older age (38.4%), being female (33.6%), being cared for in a nursing home (41.3%), or hospital (40.3%), having lost decision-making ability months before death (58.9%), and not having a documented decision to shift to EOL care (82.7%). Younger patients diagnosed with cancer and cared for at a palliative unit were more likely to have EOL discussions. The regression analysis showed similar results for next-of-kin.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: The result shows that not all patients with palliative care needs have equal access to EOL discussions, despite efforts at a national level and the recognized benefits of timely communication about the EOL care. Further efforts must be made to achieve EOL discussions for all patients.

Keywords
Communication, End of life, Older people, Palliative care, Quality indicators, Register study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9020 (URN)10.1017/S1478951521000973 (DOI)000778901000001 ()34158146 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-06-28 Created: 2021-06-28 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
Weber Falk, M., Alvariza, A., Kreicbergs, U. & Sveen, J. (2022). End-of-Life-Related Factors Associated with Posttraumatic Stress and Prolonged Grief in Parentally Bereaved Adolescents. Omega (1), 174-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>End-of-Life-Related Factors Associated with Posttraumatic Stress and Prolonged Grief in Parentally Bereaved Adolescents
2022 (English)In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764, no 1, p. 174-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and prolonged grief disorder (PGD) are well-documented in parentally bereaved adolescents. Whether or not the parent's death is perceived as traumatic may be influenced by several end-of-life-related factors. This study aimed to examine the associations between end-of-life-related factors, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), symptoms of prolonged grief disorder and PGD, and the association between PTSD and PGD. Mann-Whitney U tests and Spearman correlation were used to analyze the relationships between end-of-life-related factors, PTSD, and PGD. Regretting one's decision to be present or not present at the time of death resulted in a significant difference in self-reported scores for PTSD, but not PGD.

Keywords
Bereaved adolescents, End-of-life-related factors, Posttraumatic stress, Prolonged grief, Regret
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-8374 (URN)10.1177/0030222820963768 (DOI)000578760000001 ()33028145 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20150044Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse
Note

Forskningsfinansärer:

- Gålöstiftelsen

- Ersta Sköndal Bräcke högskola

Available from: 2020-11-20 Created: 2020-11-20 Last updated: 2022-11-02Bibliographically approved
Weber Falk, M., Salloum, A., Alvariza, A., Kreicbergs, U. & Sveen, J. (2022). Outcomes of the grief and communication family support intervention on parent and child psychological health and communication. Death Studies, 46(7), 1750-1761
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcomes of the grief and communication family support intervention on parent and child psychological health and communication
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2022 (English)In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 1750-1761Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parents and children risk developing psychological health problems following the death of a partner/parent and may need professional support. This study used the reliable change criterion and clinically significant change to examine the outcomes of the Grief and Communication Family Support Intervention, comprising three family meetings with a family therapist, among 10 parents and 14 children, using pre-post outcome scores. The results provided preliminary evidence that the Grief and Communication Family Support Intervention may improve self-esteem and reduce anxiety in some parents and may improve communication and reduce internalizing and externalizing problems in some children.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-8519 (URN)10.1080/07481187.2020.1851816 (DOI)000596185600001 ()33272135 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20150044Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse
Note

Forskningsfinansiär: Gålöstiftelsen

Available from: 2020-12-10 Created: 2020-12-10 Last updated: 2023-01-26Bibliographically approved
Holm, M., Weber Falk, M., Lövgren, M., Kreicbergs, U., Alvariza, A. & Sveen, J. (2022). Sources of social support and its importance for cancer-bereaved spouses and their minor children: A cross-sectional study. Death Studies, 46(4), 996-1002
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sources of social support and its importance for cancer-bereaved spouses and their minor children: A cross-sectional study
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2022 (English)In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 996-1002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the sources from which bereaved families with minor children reported receiving social support after the death of a parent/partner and which sources they perceived as important. Using an online platform, 23 adolescents, 42 parents, and 27 parent proxies for children aged 4-11 years, completed questionnaires. Family and friends were valued as the most important sources of social support, while social support from societal institutions, such as health care and school, was considered less important, and insufficient.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-8353 (URN)10.1080/07481187.2020.1780344 (DOI)000545692300001 ()32552419 (PubMedID)
Funder
Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse
Available from: 2020-11-04 Created: 2020-11-04 Last updated: 2022-11-02Bibliographically approved
Weber, M., Alvariza, A., Kreicbergs, U. & Sveen, J. (2022). The Grief and Communication Family Support Intervention: Intervention Fidelity, Participant Experiences, and Potential Outcomes. Death Studies, 46(1), 233-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Grief and Communication Family Support Intervention: Intervention Fidelity, Participant Experiences, and Potential Outcomes
2022 (English)In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to evaluate intervention fidelity and explore participants’ experiences and potential outcomes after participating in the intervention. Using a pretest post-test pilot study, 10 parentally bereaved families completed the three-session manual-based intervention with a family therapist. Sessions were audio-recorded. Therapists completed an adherence checklist to assess fidelity. Assessments via questionnaires and interviews occurred at one month post-intervention and via questionnaires at baseline and six months post-intervention. This study showed a high level of fidelity. The study shows preliminary evidence of the intervention’s capacity to improve communication and relationships in parentally bereaved families.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-7954 (URN)10.1080/07481187.2020.1728429 (DOI)000514881800001 ()32072870 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 20150044Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse
Note

Publication status in dissertation: Manuscript (preprint)

Forskningsfinansiär: Gålöstiftelsen

Available from: 2020-01-22 Created: 2020-01-22 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
Eklund, R., Eisma, M., Boelen, P., Arnberg, F. & Sveen, J. (2021). A Mobile App for Prolonged Grief among Bereaved Parents: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mobile App for Prolonged Grief among Bereaved Parents: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
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2021 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Bereaved parents have elevated risk to develop mental health problems, yet, few studies have evaluated the effect of psychosocial interventions developed for bereaved parents. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), both face-to-face or digitally delivered, has shown to be an effective intervention for prolonged grief symptoms. Self-help mobile apps offer various advantages and studies show improved mental health after app interventions. No app has yet been evaluated targeting prolonged grief in bereaved parents. Therefore, the aim of this planned study is to develop and examine the effectiveness of a CBT-based mobile app, called My Grief, in reducing symptoms of prolonged grief, as well as other psychological symptoms, in bereaved parents. Another aim is to assess users’ experiences and adverse events of My Grief.

Methods and analysis: We will conduct a two-armed randomized waitlist-controlled trial. Parents living in Sweden, who lost a child to cancer between one and ten years ago, with elevated symptoms of prolonged grief, will be recruited to participate in the trial. The content of My Grief covers four main domains (Learn; Self-monitoring; Exercises; Get support) and builds on principles of CBT and the proven-effective PTSD Coach app. Participants in the intervention group will fill out online questionnaires at baseline and at 3-, 6- and 12-months follow-ups, and the waitlist-controls at baseline and at 3 months. The primary outcome will be prolonged grief symptoms at the 3 months follow-up. Secondary outcomes are posttraumatic stress and depression symptoms, quality of life, and cognitive behavioral variables (i.e., avoidance, rumination, negative cognitions).

Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been received from the Swedish Ethical Review Authority (project no. 2021-00770). If the app is shown to be effective, the app will be made publicly accessible on app stores, so that it can benefit other bereaved parents.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT04552717.

National Category
Psychiatry Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9329 (URN)10.1101/2021.04.23.21256003 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR2018-0047Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, TJ2018-0002
Note

Published in: medRxiv : The Preprint Server for Health Sciences

Available from: 2021-12-02 Created: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
Angelhoff, C., Sveen, J., Alvariza, A., Weber Falk, M. & Kreicbergs, U. (2021). Communication, self-esteem and prolonged grief in parent-adolescent dyads, 1-4 years following the death of a parent to cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 50, Article ID 101883.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication, self-esteem and prolonged grief in parent-adolescent dyads, 1-4 years following the death of a parent to cancer
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2021 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 50, article id 101883Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Talking and grieving together may be advantageous for maintaining belief in a meaningful future and can help bereaved adolescents and their parents to cope better with the situation. The aim of this study was to explore communication, self-esteem and prolonged grief in adolescent-parent dyads, following the death of a parent to cancer.

METHOD: This study has a descriptive and comparative design. Twenty family dyads consisting of parentally bereaved adolescents (12-19 years) and their widowed parents completed the Parent and Adolescent Communication Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Prolonged Grief-13, 1-4 years following the death of a parent.

RESULTS: Twelve family dyads reported normal-high parent-adolescent communication, 11 dyads rated normal-high self-esteem. Two adolescents and three parents scored above the cut-off for possible prolonged grief disorder (≥35), none of these were in the same dyads. There was a difference (p < .05) between boys (mean 40.0) and girls (mean 41.9) with regard to open family communication, as assessed by parents. Girls reported lower self-esteem (mean 26.0) than boys (mean 34.1, p < .01).

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insights from parentally bereaved families which indicate that despite experiencing the often-traumatic life event of losing a parent or partner, most participants reported normal parent-adolescent communication, normal self-esteem and few symptoms of prolonged grief. The potential usefulness of identifying families who may need professional support in family communication following the death of a parent is discussed.

Keywords
Adolescents, Bereavement, Communication, Family centred care, Family nursing, Person-centred care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-8562 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2020.101883 (DOI)000632612300018 ()33360292 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Kamprad Family Foundation, 54502
Note

Forskningsfinansiär: Gålöstiftelsen, [54505]

Available from: 2021-02-01 Created: 2021-02-01 Last updated: 2022-01-07Bibliographically approved
Weber, M., Alvariza, A., Kreicbergs, U. & Sveen, J. (2021). Family Communication and Psychological Health in Children and Adolescents Following a Parent's Death From Cancer.. Omega, 83(3), 630-648
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Communication and Psychological Health in Children and Adolescents Following a Parent's Death From Cancer.
2021 (English)In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 630-648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parentally bereaved children and adolescents are at risk of developing psychological health problems. Evidence for a correlation between communication and broad measures of psychological health exists in other populations. The aim of this study was to examine associations between family communication and specific aspects of psychological health for children and adolescents following a parent’s death from cancer using parent-proxy and adolescent self-reports. Parent-proxy reports for children and adolescents, and adolescent self-reports for Parent–Adolescent Communication, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and Prolonged Grief-13 child were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman’s correlation. Parents rated communication as moderate in quality and reported good psychological health for children and adolescents. Adolescent self-reports indicated low-quality communication with their parent and poor psychological health. Significant associations between Parent–Adolescent Communication subscales and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire subscales were found for each group. Prolonged grief was associated with emotional problems but not communication for all three groups.

Keywords
Childhood bereavement, Externalizing problems, Family communication, Internalizing problems, Prolonged grief
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-7687 (URN)10.1177/0030222819859965 (DOI)000664210200012 ()31256707 (PubMedID)
Note

Publication status in dissertation: Epub Ahead of Print

Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2021-09-08Bibliographically approved
Sveen, J., Jernelöv, S., Pohlkamp, L., Kreicbergs, U. & Kaldo, V. (2021). Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of guided internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia after the loss of a child to cancer: Randomized controlled trial. Internet Interventions, 25, Article ID 100409.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of guided internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia after the loss of a child to cancer: Randomized controlled trial
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2021 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 25, article id 100409Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bereaved individuals often experience sleep problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility and preliminary effects of internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (iCBT-i) in bereaved parents. Parents were randomized to iCBT-i (n = 10) or an active control group (n = 11). Primary outcome (insomnia) and secondary outcomes (prolonged grief, depression, posttraumatic stress, and grief rumination) were assessed pre- and post-treatment, with 9- and 18-month follow-ups. Feasibility was assessed post-treatment and one month later. Most parents reported positive effects of the treatment. The intervention group improved significantly from pre- to post-treatment and had a significantly larger reduction of insomnia when analyzed over all four time-points (Wald χ2 = 30.0, p < 0.001), although the effect at post-treatment was very small (d = 0.1) for insomnia. Thus, iCBT-i was feasible and was related to reduced insomnia and psychological distress in bereaved parents, both short- and long-term, but the results regarding the treatment effect are preliminary due to the small sample size.

Keywords
Bereavement, Child loss, Internet intervention, Treatment
National Category
Applied Psychology Psychiatry Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9194 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2021.100409 (DOI)000687262000004 ()34401368 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, TJ2015-0021Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR2015-0050
Note

Forskningsfinansiär: ALF-avtal

Available from: 2021-12-28 Created: 2021-12-28 Last updated: 2021-12-28Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5523-8126

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