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Holm, M., Lövgren, M., Alvariza, A., Eklund, R. & Kreicbergs, U. (2024). Experiences of being a severely ill parent of dependent children receiving care at home: Hopes and challenges. Palliative & Supportive Care, 22(1), 169-173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of being a severely ill parent of dependent children receiving care at home: Hopes and challenges
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2024 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 169-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Multiple studies have focused on severely ill patients in the role as parents of dependent children, yet few have explored the thoughts and feelings within this group during palliative home care.

METHODS: This qualitative study derives from a pilot intervention study, the Family Talk Intervention (FTI), in specialized palliative home care. The FTI is a support program with the main goal to increase family communication about illness-related topics. The study is based on field notes from 104 sessions with 20 parents taken by an interventionist during intervention delivery. The field notes were analyzed using the principles of qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: The field notes revealed several challenging situations for parents with severe illness. A major issue was how to find ways to talk to their children about their illness and prognosis. The parents expressed guilt for being unable to fulfill their roles as parents and partners. Existing family conflicts had escalated with the illness, according to some parents. Despite being affected by illness, parents tried to have hope, if only for small things - such as a period of ordinary family life.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Severely ill parents in specialized palliative home care seek support regarding how to communicate and stay connected to their roles in the family, which is a struggle when a parent is cared for at home, while it in contrast may promote normality and hope. Communication with children is vital and needs to be brought to the attention of health-care professionals. A family-centered focus, involving both parents and children, should be embraced.

Keywords
Children, Communication, Intervention, Palliative home care, Parents
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-10143 (URN)10.1017/S1478951523000184 (DOI)36987845 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-04-11 Created: 2023-04-11 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Holm, M., Lundberg, T., Lövgren, M. & Ljungman, L. (2024). Parenting a child with cancer and maintaining a healthy couple relationship: Findings from the Family Talk Intervention. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 71(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parenting a child with cancer and maintaining a healthy couple relationship: Findings from the Family Talk Intervention
2024 (English)In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 71, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Despite the challenges that caring for a child with cancer brings for parents, little knowledge is available concerning the effects on the parents’ couple relationship. Furthermore, few interventions have been designed to support parents in their couple relationship. The aim of this paper was, therefore, to explore parents’ experiences of their couple relationship while having a dependent child with cancer and the support they received from a family-based intervention, the Family Talk Intervention (FTI).

Methods Data for this paper were taken from semi-structured interviews performed in a pilot study of the FTI in the context of pediatric oncology. In total, 22 couples were interviewed after participating in the FTI. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results Parents described how maintaining a couple relationship while living with childhood cancer could be very challenging and was not given the highest priority. The FTI was considered a way of providing important support to the couple and a chance for them to sit down together and listen to each other's perspectives on the situation. Parents described that the FTI had helped them gain an increased mutual understanding, sometimes also helping them to realize that they needed more extensive professional support in their relationship.

Conclusions Living with childhood cancer and upholding a healthy couple relationship is challenging for parents. The FTI has the potential to support couples, mainly by providing opportunities for parents to communicate with each other. However, some couples may be in need of a tailored clinical intervention.

Keywords
Childhood cancer, Parents, Psycho-educational, Relationship, Support
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Individual in the Welfare Society, Palliative Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-10526 (URN)10.1002/pbc.30709 (DOI)37817346 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation
Available from: 2023-12-06 Created: 2023-12-06 Last updated: 2023-12-07Bibliographically approved
Ayoub, M., Udo, C., Årestedt, K., Kreicbergs, U. & Lövgren, M. (2024). The Family Talk Intervention in Pediatric Oncology: Potential Effects Reported by Parents. Children, 11(1), Article ID 95.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Family Talk Intervention in Pediatric Oncology: Potential Effects Reported by Parents
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2024 (English)In: Children, E-ISSN 2227-9067, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Childhood cancer impacts the family system and has psychosocial consequences for all family members. For the parents, the ill child, and the siblings to be able to adjust to this challenging situation, the whole family needs access to psychosocial support. However, only a few such family interventions in pediatric oncology have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to explore the potential effects of a family-centered intervention, the Family Talk Intervention (FTI), in pediatric oncology from the parents’ perspectives.

Methods: A concurrent mixed methods design was used for this study. Data were derived from a pilot study of 26 families recruited from one pediatric oncology center in Sweden. This study focused on questionnaire and interview data from 52 parents.

Results: After participation in FTI, the parents felt more satisfied with the conversations within the family about the illness. FTI also contributed to strengthened family togetherness, including more open communication and improved family relations, as described by the parents. Parents further expressed that they felt more empowered in their parenting role following FTI.

Conclusions: The findings regarding FTI’s ability to improve family communication and family relations, thus strengthening family togetherness in families with childhood cancer, are promising. This provides motivation for a large-scale study of FTIs in pediatric oncology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abbaye de Maredsous, 2024
Keywords
Family Talk Intervention, Pediatric oncology, Psychosocial support, Family, Parents
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
The Individual in the Welfare Society, Palliative Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-10638 (URN)10.3390/children11010095 (DOI)
Available from: 2024-01-22 Created: 2024-01-22 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved
Landfeldt, E., Udo, C., Lövgren, M., Sejersen, T. & Kreicbergs, U. (2023). Health-related quality of life of children with spinal muscular atrophy in Sweden: A prospective cohort study in the era of disease-modifying therapy. European journal of paediatric neurology, 46, 67-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life of children with spinal muscular atrophy in Sweden: A prospective cohort study in the era of disease-modifying therapy
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2023 (English)In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 46, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to estimate change over time in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in Sweden. Children with SMA were identified via the National Patient Register by the National Board of Health and Welfare in Sweden. Patient HRQoL was caregiver proxy-assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales at baseline, as well as at 6, 12, and 18 months of follow-up. Results were stratified by SMA type. Mothers and fathers to 27 children with SMA (mean patient age: 9.17 years; 59% female) participated in the study. All patients received disease-modifying therapy. At baseline, across SMA types, the mean total score was estimated at between 52.68 and 59.19, Physical Functioning score at between 26.39 and 40.34, Emotional Functioning score at between 66.82 and 68.57, Social Functioning score at between 55.00 and 70.45, and School Functioning score at between 70.45 and 78.33. The mean annual total score change was estimated at −2.03 for SMA type I, 4.11 for SMA type II, and 1.12 for SMA type III. In conclusion, we show that SMA has a detrimental impact on HRQoL that extends above and beyond somatic disability. Children with SMA type II experienced a dramatic increase in HRQoL over time, predominantly related to improvement in physical and social functioning. Our data helps quantify the patient burden of disease and adds to the rapidly expanding body of evidence of the effectiveness of recently approved disease-modifying therapies for SMA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Individual in the Welfare Society, Palliative Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-10639 (URN)10.1016/j.ejpn.2023.06.008 (DOI)37473536 (PubMedID)
Funder
Anna-Lisa and Bror Björnsson FoundationStockholm County Council, ALF FoUI-953828Stiftelsen Sunnerdahls Handikappfond
Available from: 2024-01-22 Created: 2024-01-22 Last updated: 2024-01-22Bibliographically approved
Akkawi El Edelbi, R., Eksborg, S., Kreicbergs, U., Lövgren, M., Wallén, K., Ekman, J. & Lindemalm, S. (2023). Parents' experiences of handling oral anticancer drugs at home: 'It all falls on me …'. Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, 29(1), 94-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' experiences of handling oral anticancer drugs at home: 'It all falls on me …'
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of parents handling oral anticancer drugs in a home setting.

METHODS: Parents of children with cancer were recruited from a paediatric oncology ward in Sweden to participate in an interview. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: We found the following categories and subcategories: parents' views on the provided information-lack of, too little or contradictory information, and parents' preferences for information delivery; safety over time; correct drug dose; and drug administration. As time passed, most parents adapted to their child's illness, felt safer and found it easier to take in and process any given information. Parents preferred information in different formats (written, movie clips and orally) and in their mother tongue. Many parents were aware of the importance of giving an accurate dose to their child and described the process of drug administration as overwhelming.

CONCLUSION: Parents need to be provided with accurate, timely, nonconflicting and repeated information-in different forms and in their mother tongue-on how to handle oral anticancer drugs at home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2023
Keywords
Experiences, Handling, Home, Oral anticancer drugs, Parents
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9719 (URN)10.1111/jep.13737 (DOI)000836018800001 ()35927976 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-08-19 Created: 2022-08-19 Last updated: 2024-02-09Bibliographically approved
Thermaenius, I., Udo, C., Alvariza, A. & Lövgren, M. (2023). The Family Talk Intervention för barnfamiljer med palliativa vårdbehov: Hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorers initiala erfarenheter av hinder och möjligheter i klinisk praktik. In: : . Paper presented at Framtidens palliativa vård - Den 8:e nationella konferensen i palliativ vård, 2-4 oktober 2023, Malmö.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Family Talk Intervention för barnfamiljer med palliativa vårdbehov: Hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorers initiala erfarenheter av hinder och möjligheter i klinisk praktik
2023 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

Bakgrund När ett barn eller förälder drabbas av svår sjukdom påverkas alla familjemedlemmar. Behovet av psykosocialt stöd är identifierat sedan länge, trots detta finns få vetenskapligt utvärderade psykosociala stödprogram för hela familjen. Än mindre forskning om faktorer som påverkar införandet av nya psykosociala stödprogram i klinisk praktik. Kunskap om detta skulle kunna underlätta framtida strategier för implementering av psykosociala insatser.

Syfte Att utforska hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorers erfarenheter av hinder och möjligheter vid införandet av ett psykosocialt familjebaserat stödprogram, the Family Talk Intervention (FTI), i klinisk praktik bland barnfamiljer med palliativa vårdbehov.

Metod Delstudien ingår i ett större effekt-implementeringsprojekt som utvärderar FTI inom cancervård och specialiserad hemsjukvård där en förälder är svårt sjuk, samt på barnsjukhus och barnhospice där ett barn är svårt sjuk. Studien baseras på 11 fokusgrupper med 43 kuratorer som genomgått utbildning i FTI. Utbildningen innehöll teori, rollspel samt att genomföra FTI under handledning. FTI är en manualbaserad familjeintervention med målet att underlätta kommunikationen i familjen, öka kunskapen om sjukdomsrelaterade frågor, stödja föräldraskapet, samt synliggöra barnens behov. Data analyserades med kvalitativ innehållsanalys.

Resultat Flera av hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorerna beskrev att FTI gav struktur till arbetet med barnfamiljer genom att barnens perspektiv synliggjordes (sjuka barn och barn som närstående) liksom familjens behov i stort. Teamet sågs av flera hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorer som en resurs vid rekrytering, men graden av deras involvering varierade. Vårdrelaterade faktorer som möjliggjorde eller hindrade implementeringen var relaterade till var i sjukdomsförloppet patienten befann sig, längden på vårdtiden samt vårdformen (slutenvård, öppenvård eller hemsjukvård). Vidare beskrevs bristande stöd från chef, hög arbetsbelastning, oklara förväntningar, hög personalomsättning samt ensamarbete som hindrande faktorer vid införandet av FTI.

Konklusion Studien visar vikten av att beakta kontextuella faktorer, arbetsmiljöns påverkan i stort, liksom betydelsen av chefens engagemang för att uppnå en framgångsrik implementering av nya metoder

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
The Individual in the Welfare Society, Palliative Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-10602 (URN)
Conference
Framtidens palliativa vård - Den 8:e nationella konferensen i palliativ vård, 2-4 oktober 2023, Malmö
Available from: 2024-01-17 Created: 2024-01-17 Last updated: 2024-03-18Bibliographically approved
Melin-Johansson, C., Sveen, J., Lövgren, M. & Udo, C. (2022). A third of dying patients do not have end-of-life discussions with a physician: A nationwide registry study. Palliative & Supportive Care, 20(3), 357-362
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A third of dying patients do not have end-of-life discussions with a physician: A nationwide registry study
2022 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 357-362Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to explore the proportion of adult patients and next-of-kin who had end-of-life (EOL) discussions and associated factors.

METHOD: A retrospective nationwide registry study was reported with data from the Swedish Register of Palliative Care. All patients in Sweden in hospitals, nursing homes, own homes, community, and palliative care units during 2015-2017 and their next-of-kin were included. Data were reported to the register by healthcare staff, based on diseased patients' records regarding their last days of life, and were voluntary. Descriptive statistics illustrated the proportion of patients/next-of-kin who had EOL discussions and logistic regressions were used to examine associated factors.

RESULTS: About half of the patients (46%) did have an EOL discussion, but a third (32%) did not. Associated factors of those who did not have an EOL discussion were dementia (48.5%) or stroke (47.5%), older age (38.4%), being female (33.6%), being cared for in a nursing home (41.3%), or hospital (40.3%), having lost decision-making ability months before death (58.9%), and not having a documented decision to shift to EOL care (82.7%). Younger patients diagnosed with cancer and cared for at a palliative unit were more likely to have EOL discussions. The regression analysis showed similar results for next-of-kin.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: The result shows that not all patients with palliative care needs have equal access to EOL discussions, despite efforts at a national level and the recognized benefits of timely communication about the EOL care. Further efforts must be made to achieve EOL discussions for all patients.

Keywords
Communication, End of life, Older people, Palliative care, Quality indicators, Register study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9020 (URN)10.1017/S1478951521000973 (DOI)000778901000001 ()34158146 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-06-28 Created: 2021-06-28 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
Bergersen, E., Larsson, M., Lövgren, M. & Olsson, C. (2022). Adolescents' and young people's needs and preferences for support when living with a parent with life-threatening cancer: A grounded theory study. BMC Palliative Care, 21(1), Article ID 164.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents' and young people's needs and preferences for support when living with a parent with life-threatening cancer: A grounded theory study
2022 (English)In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Living with a parent facing life-threatening illness and losing a mom or dad at a young age can cause both short- and long-term health problems. Without satisfactory support, adolescents' and young people are at risk of developing low self-esteem, behavioural difficulties (e.g., anger and aggression), long-term illness or premature death caused by severe mental illness, substance abuse, self-harm and suicide attempts. The aim of this study was to explore adolescents' and young people's needs and preferences for support as they live with a parent with life-threatening cancer.

METHODS: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 respondents (17-24 years) in Norway and Sweden. Data were analysed through grounded theory according to Charmaz.

RESULTS: Adolescents' and young peoples' needs and preferences for support were described through the main category 'To feel safe and secure and to be prepared' and further broken down into five subcategories 'Relationships in the immediate family-balancing support and protection'; 'The social network-support and normalcy in a carefully selected group'; 'Maintaining everyday life-challenges in school and working life'; 'The right support at the right time-competence, trust and continuity in meeting health care professionals'; and 'Support outside the home-an opportunity for full transparency'.

CONCLUSION: Adolescents' and young peoples' preferences for support when living with a parent facing life-threatening illness are individual and unique, but they share a common need to feel safe and secure and to be prepared. Adolescents and young people express that they primarily want support from parents and friends, but they also want support from health care professionals, especially in situations when the ill parent becomes worse. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance for health care professionals to identify the most vulnerable adolescents and young people by mapping their social networks and paying extra attention to their needs for support when there is deterioration in the parent's illness state. This study also highlights the importance for health care professionals to establish a good relationship with adolescents and young people to meet their needs and preferences for support. In addition, information and support are needed in a timely manner and adapted to the life-threatening ill parent's illness state and individual's needs and preferences to optimise preparedness.

Keywords
Adolescent, Cancer, Grounded theory, Palliative care, Support, Young people
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9799 (URN)10.1186/s12904-022-01055-7 (DOI)000857137200001 ()36138453 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-10-04 Created: 2022-10-04 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Weber Falk, M., Eklund, R., Kreicbergs, U., Alvariza, A. & Lövgren, M. (2022). Breaking the silence about illness and death: Potential effects of a pilot study of the family talk intervention when a parent with dependent children receives specialized palliative home care. Palliative & Supportive Care, 512-518
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breaking the silence about illness and death: Potential effects of a pilot study of the family talk intervention when a parent with dependent children receives specialized palliative home care
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2022 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, p. 512-518Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The entire family is affected when a parent is severely ill. Parents often need and appreciate professional support when talking to children about illness and death. The family talk intervention (FTI) is family-centered and intends to promote communication about the illness and its consequences, support parenting to enhance family coping and help family members share experiences with each other to create a shared family history. This study aimed to explore potential effects of FTI in specialized palliative home care, as reported by parents.

Method: This pre-post test intervention pilot was conducted in specialized palliative home care. A convergent mixed-method design was used to analyze interview and questionnaire data. Twenty families with dependent children were recruited from two specialized palliative home care units in Stockholm, Sweden.

Results: Parents reported that family communication improved after participation in FTI as family members learned communication strategies that facilitated open sharing of thoughts and feelings. Increased open communication helped family members gain a better understanding of each other's perspectives. Parents reported that relationships with their partner and children had improved as they now shared several strategies for maintaining family relationships. Parents were also less worried following participation in FTI. The ill parents stated that they gained a sense of security and were less worried about the future.

Significance of results: This study adds to the evidence that FTI may be a useful intervention for families with dependent children and an ill parent in a palliative care setting. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT03119545.

Keywords
Child, Family, Palliative supportive care, Pilot study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-9253 (URN)10.1017/s1478951521001322 (DOI)000778889800001 ()35876452 (PubMedID)
Funder
Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse, 545 02
Available from: 2021-11-17 Created: 2021-11-17 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
Eklund, R., Jalmsell, L., Kreicbergs, U., Alvariza, A. & Lövgren, M. (2022). Children’s experiences of the family talk intervention when a parent is cared for in palliative home care: A feasibility study. Death Studies, 46(7), 1655-1666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children’s experiences of the family talk intervention when a parent is cared for in palliative home care: A feasibility study
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2022 (English)In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 1655-1666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim with this study was to explore minor children’s experiences of the Family Talk Intervention (FTI) when a parent is cared for in palliative home care, with a focus on feasibility. The main goal of FTI is to increase family communication about the illness. This paper is based on 25 children’s reports, derived from a pilot study with a mixed method design, involving both questionnaires and interviews, performed after the children’s participation. A majority of the children appreciated the structure and content of FTI. They felt seen, heard and acknowledged by the interventionists and recommended FTI to other children in similar situations.

Keywords
Children, Family, The family talk intervention, Feasibility, Mixed method, Palliative Care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-8127 (URN)10.1080/07481187.2020.1829747 (DOI)000577655100001 ()33054633 (PubMedID)
Funder
Familjen Erling-Perssons Stiftelse, 54502
Note

Publication status in dissertation: Submitted

Available from: 2020-05-15 Created: 2020-05-15 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
Projects
The Family Talk Intervention in clinical practice when a parent with dependent children or a child is severely ill: An effectiveness-implementation study [2021-00999_VR]; Marie Cederschiöld University; Publications
Holm, M., Lövgren, M., Alvariza, A., Eklund, R. & Kreicbergs, U. (2024). Experiences of being a severely ill parent of dependent children receiving care at home: Hopes and challenges. Palliative & Supportive Care, 22(1), 169-173Holm, M., Lundberg, T., Lövgren, M. & Ljungman, L. (2024). Parenting a child with cancer and maintaining a healthy couple relationship: Findings from the Family Talk Intervention. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 71(1)Ayoub, M., Udo, C., Årestedt, K., Kreicbergs, U. & Lövgren, M. (2024). The Family Talk Intervention in Pediatric Oncology: Potential Effects Reported by Parents. Children, 11(1), Article ID 95. Thermaenius, I., Udo, C., Alvariza, A. & Lövgren, M. (2023). The Family Talk Intervention för barnfamiljer med palliativa vårdbehov: Hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorers initiala erfarenheter av hinder och möjligheter i klinisk praktik. In: : . Paper presented at Framtidens palliativa vård - Den 8:e nationella konferensen i palliativ vård, 2-4 oktober 2023, Malmö. Weber Falk, M., Eklund, R., Kreicbergs, U., Alvariza, A. & Lövgren, M. (2022). Breaking the silence about illness and death: Potential effects of a pilot study of the family talk intervention when a parent with dependent children receives specialized palliative home care. Palliative & Supportive Care, 512-518Eklund, R., Jalmsell, L., Kreicbergs, U., Alvariza, A. & Lövgren, M. (2022). Children’s experiences of the family talk intervention when a parent is cared for in palliative home care: A feasibility study. Death Studies, 46(7), 1655-1666Eklund, R., Kreicbergs, U., Alvariza, A. & Lövgren, M. (2022). Children's views are not taken into account in accordance with article 12 of the united nations convention on the rights of the child in the family talk intervention when a parent is cared for in palliative care. Omega, 85(1), 126-154Lövgren, M. (2022). Ett stödprogram för barnfamiljer när någon i familjen är svårt sjuk: The Family Talk Intervention. Palliativ vård - tidskriften för palliativ vård i Sverige (2), 16-18Lövgren, M., Udo, C. & Kreicbergs, U. (2022). Is the family talk intervention feasible in paediatric oncology?: An evaluation of a family-based psychosocial intervention. Acta Paediatrica, 111(3), 684-692Lövgren, M. (2022). Samtal om det som är svårt. Barnläkaren, 14-15
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4736-500X

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