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Sandberg, Jonas
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Sveen, J., Pohlkamp, L., Öhlén, J., Sandberg, J., Brandänge, K. & Gustavsson, P. (2016). Posttraumatic stress among not-exposed traumatically bereaved relatives after the MS Estonia disaster. PLOS ONE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posttraumatic stress among not-exposed traumatically bereaved relatives after the MS Estonia disaster
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2016 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Little is known about posttraumatic stress (PTS) reactions in bereaved individuals following loss in disaster who were not directly exposed to disaster. The aim of the present study was to examine the course of PTS up to three years after losing relatives in the MS Estonia ferry disaster, one of the worst maritime disasters in modern times.

Methods: Seven postal surveys were sent out over three years post-disaster. The respondents were invited and added consecutively during the three years and 938 relatives participated in one or more of the surveys, representing 89% of the MS Estonia's Swedish victims. The survey included the Impact of Event Scale (IES) to measure PTS. Latent growth curve modeling was used to analyze PTS over time.

Results: The majority of bereaved individuals had high levels of PTS. At three years post-loss, 62% of the respondents scored above the recommended cut-off value on the IES. Over time, PTS symptoms declined, but initially high symptoms of PTS were associated with a slower recovery rate.

Conclusion: The present finding suggests that being an indirectly-exposed disaster-bereaved close-relative can lead to very high levels of PTS which are sustained for several years.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-6256 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0166441 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-01-30 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2021-06-14Bibliographically approved
Håkanson, C., Sandberg, J., Ekstedt, M., Kenne Sarenmalm, E., Christiansen, M. & Öhlen, J. (2015). Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless. Qualitative Health Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless
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2015 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person’s health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
Death and dying, Homelessness, Interpretive description, Knowledge construction, Palliative care, Qualitative, Sweden
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-4901 (URN)10.1177/1049732315588500 (DOI)25994318 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-05 Created: 2015-11-05 Last updated: 2024-02-20Bibliographically approved
Håkansson, C., Seiger Cronfalk, B., Henriksen, E., Norberg, A., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Sandberg, J. (2014). First-line managers’ views on leadership and palliative care in Swedish nursing homes. Open Nursing Journal, 8, 71-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First-line managers’ views on leadership and palliative care in Swedish nursing homes
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2014 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers' views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes. The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested.

Keywords
end-of-life, first line managers, leadership, older people, palliative care, qualitative analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-3038 (URN)10.2174/1874434601408010071 (DOI)25628769 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Financial support was received from the FOU-NU Research and Development Centre, Stockholm and from the Erling Persson Family Foundation.

Available from: 2014-03-17 Created: 2014-03-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Håkanson, C., Seiger Cronfalk, B., Henrikssen, E., Norberg, A., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Sandberg, J. (2014). First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care. Open Nursing Journal, 8, 71-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care
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2014 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers’ views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care.

Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviewswere conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes.

The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested.

Keywords
End-of-life, First line managers, Leadership, Older people, Palliative care, Qualitative analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-4902 (URN)10.2174/1874434601408010071 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-11-05 Created: 2015-11-05 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Carlander (Goliath), I., Ternestedt, B.-M., Sandberg, J. & Hellström, I. (2013). Constructing family identity close to death. Open Journal of Nursing, 3(5), 379-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constructing family identity close to death
2013 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 379-388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Daily life close to death involves physical, psychological, and social strain, exposing patients and their family members to major transitions affecting relational patterns and identity. For the individual family member, this often means sharing life with a changing person in a changing relationship, disrupting both individual identity and family identity. Our aim was to deepen the understanding of individual experiences that are important in constructing family identity close to death at home. We performed a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected through 40 interviews with persons with life-threatening illness and the family members who shared everyday life with them. The analysis resulted in interpretive descriptions which provided three patterns important for creating family identity, which we here call “we-ness” close to death. The patterns were: being an existential person, being an extension of the other, and being together in existential loneliness. Together, these three patterns seemed to play a part in the construction of family identity; we-ness, close to death. One important finding was the tension between the search for togetherness in “we-ness” while dealing with an existential loneliness, which seemed to capture an essential aspect of being a family of which one member is dying.

Keywords
dying, identity, family, palliative care, secondary analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-3645 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2013.35051 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, H., Sandberg, J. & Hellström, I. (2013). Experiences of long-term home care as an informal caregiver to a spouse: gendered meanings in everyday life for female carers.. International journal of older people nursing, 8(2), 159-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of long-term home care as an informal caregiver to a spouse: gendered meanings in everyday life for female carers.
2013 (English)In: International journal of older people nursing, ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: In this article, we explore the gender aspects of long-term caregiving from the perspective of women providing home care for a spouse suffering from dementia.

BACKGROUND: One of the most common circumstances in which a woman gradually steps into a long-term caregiver role at home involves caring for a spouse suffering from dementia. Little attention has been paid to examining the experiences and motivations of such caregivers from a feminist perspective.

METHODS: Twelve women, all of whom were informal caregivers to a partner suffering from dementia, were interviewed on the following themes: the home, their partner's disease, everyday life, their relationship and autonomy. The results of these interviews were analysed in relation to gender identity and social power structures using a feminist perspective.

RESULTS: The findings of this study show that the informants frequently reflected on their caregiving activities in terms of both general and heteronormative expectations. The results suggest that the process of heteropolarisation in these cases can be an understood as a consequence of both the spouse's illness and the resulting caring duties. Also, the results suggest that the act of caring leads to introspections concerning perceived 'shortcomings' as a caregiver. Finally, the results indicate that it is important to recognise when the need for support in day-to-day caring is downplayed.

CONCLUSIONS: Women view their caregiving role and responsibilities as paramount; their other duties, including caring for themselves, are deemed less important. We stress that the intense commitment and responsibilities that women experience in their day-to-day caring must be acknowledged and that it is important for healthcare professionals to find mechanisms for providing choices for female caregivers without neglecting their moral concerns.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Female carers face difficulties in always living up to gendered standards and this need to be considered when evaluating policies and practices for family carers.

Keywords
female carers, feminist perspective, informal care giving, qualitative methods
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-3643 (URN)10.1111/j.1748-3743.2012.00340.x (DOI)22805660 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, H., Sandberg, J., Holmgren, J. & Pringle, K. (2013). His helping hands-adult daughter's perceptions' of fathers with caregiving responsibility. European Journal of Social Work, 16(2), 235-248
Open this publication in new window or tab >>His helping hands-adult daughter's perceptions' of fathers with caregiving responsibility
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 235-248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women's position as informal carers has been taken for granted in social policy and social professions, while relatively few discussions have elaborated on caring as a later life activity for men and the impact on family care. This study explores the processes connected to informal caregiving in later life through the position of adult daughters of older fathers engaged with long-term caregiving responsibilities for a partner. A sample of eight daughters, with fathers having primary caregiving responsibility for their ill partners was recruited and in-depth interviews were carried out and analysed according to qualitative procedures. The daughters' descriptions of their relationships with their fathers show that being an older man who engages in caring can have a positive outcome on relations. Even if some of the daughters have doubts about their fathers “masculine authenticity”, all of them appear to cherish “his helping hands” as a carer and closer more intimate relationships with their fathers. Caring for an old and frail spouse may potentially present alternative ways of being a man beyond traditional ‘male activities’ and that caring might also sometimes involve a re-construction of gender identities. It is suggested that social work professionals may use a gendered understanding to assess and work strategically with daughters and other family members who support caring fathers.

Abstract [sv]

Kvinnors position som informella vårdare har ofta tagits för givet i forskning om och socialpolitisk styrning av informell vård inom familjen i västeuropa, medan relativt få diskussioner har förts om mäns delaktighet och ansvar för densamma. Män som helt oförutsett hamnar i en situation i livet där de måste bestämma sig för om man ska ta sig an ett påtagligt vårdansvar går på många sätt bortom alla de förutsättningar som män vardagsvis har att hantera i livet. Genom att undersöka vårdande mäns insatser i sina familjer kan man lära sig en del av vad som faktiskt sker när män tar på sig ett långvarigt vårdansvar. I denna studie har vi intervjuat åtta döttrar som växt upp och/eller levt nära en pappa som under lång tid vårdat sin partner i det egna hemmet. Resultatet visar att när män har ett långvarigt vårdansvar så kommer det också något gott ur de kunskaper de fått av vårdandet i relation till de egna barnen. Alla döttrar som vi intervjuat prisar sina fäders insatser och -hans hjälpande händer- därför att det hade gett dem en närmare och mer “genuin” relation. Resultatet visar också att vårdansvaret för männen inneburit att de bryter mot rådande konventioner om vad manlighet är och på olika sätt fått hantera och betala för det priset i det offentliga livet. Ett långvarigt och påtagligt vårdansvar innebär således en transformering av sociala relationer, privat och offentligt samt att presentera ett alternativt sätt att vara man på. Avslutningsvis föreslås en mer genusbaserad förståelse och ett mer strategiskt arbets- och förhållningsätt bland professionella, i socialt och välfärdsarbete, i mötet med döttrar och andra familjemedlemmar som stödjer sina vårdande fäder.

Keywords
Care Givers, Gender/Feminism, Older People, Parenting, informell vård, omsorg, maskulinitet
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-3646 (URN)10.1080/13691457.2011.618116 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Sandberg, J. & Eriksson, H. (2013). Makt, genus och identitet. In: Birgitta Andershed; Britt-Marie Ternestedt; Cecilia Håkanson (Ed.), Palliativ vård: Begrepp och perspektiv i teori och praktik (pp. 61-69). Lund
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Makt, genus och identitet
2013 (Swedish)In: Palliativ vård: Begrepp och perspektiv i teori och praktik / [ed] Birgitta Andershed; Britt-Marie Ternestedt; Cecilia Håkanson, Lund, 2013, p. 61-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: , 2013
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-3664 (URN)9789144070964 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-04-25 Created: 2014-04-25 Last updated: 2023-08-22Bibliographically approved
Carlander (Goliath), I., Ternestedt, B.-M., Sahlberg-Blom, E., Hellström, I. & Sandberg, J. (2011). Being me and being us in a family living close to death at home. Qualitative Health Research, 21(5), 683-695
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being me and being us in a family living close to death at home
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2011 (English)In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 683-695Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We used interpretive description to describe how everyday life close to death was experienced and dealt with in families with one member who had a life-threatening illness. We performed 28 individual, couple, and group interviews with five families. We found two patterns, namely, “being me in a family living close to death” and “being us in a family living close to death.” “Being me” meant that everyone in the family individually had to deal with the impending death, regardless of whether he or she was the person with the life-threatening illness or not. This was linked to ways of promoting the own self-image, of “me-ness.” This pattern was present at the same time as the pattern of “being us,” in other words, being a family, and dealing with impending death and a new “we-ness,” as a group. “Striving for the optimal way of living close to death” was the core theme.

Keywords
death and dying, families, illness and disease, interpretive methods, palliative care, self, social identity
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1197 (URN)10.1177/1049732310396102 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-06-09 Created: 2011-06-08 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
Carlander (Goliath), I., Ternestedt, B.-M., Sahlberg-Blom, E., Hellström, I. & Sandberg, J. (2011). Four aspects of self-image close to death at home. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 6(2), 5931
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Four aspects of self-image close to death at home
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2011 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 5931-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Living close to death means an inevitable confrontation with one’s own existential limitation. In this article, we argue that everyday life close to death embodies an identity work in progress. We used a narrative approach and a holistic-content reading to analyze twelve interviews conducted with three persons close to death. By illuminating the unique stories and identifying patterns among the participants’ narratives, we found four themes exemplifying important aspects of the identity work related to everyday life close to death. Two of the themes, named “Inside and outside of me” and “Searching for togetherness”, represented the core of the self-image, and were framed by the other themes, “My place in space” and “My death and my time”. Our findings elucidate the way the individual stories moved between the past, the present, and the future. This study challenges the idea that everyday life close to impending death primarily means limitations. The findings show that the search for meaning, new knowledge, and community can form a part of a conscious and ongoing identity work close to death. 

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1206 (URN)10.3402/qhw.v6i2.5931 (DOI)
Projects
Death and dying, identity, narrative research, palliative care, qualitative inquiry,self-image
Available from: 2011-06-09 Created: 2011-06-09 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
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