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Hansebo, Görel
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Hedman, R., Hellström, I., Ternestedt, B.-M., Hansebo, G. & Norberg, A. (2018). Sense of Self in Alzheimer’s Research Participants. Clinical Nursing Research, 27(2), 191-212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sense of Self in Alzheimer’s Research Participants
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2018 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 191-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The sense of self is vulnerable in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and might be positively and negatively influenced by research participation. The purpose of this study was to describe how people with AD express their experience of being a research participant with respect to their sense of self. Interviews and support group conversations involving 13 people with mild and moderate AD were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes were constructed: contributing to an important cause, gaining from participating, and experiencing risks and drawbacks. Participants described contributing to research as being in line with their lifelong values and lifestyles. They expressed contentment and pride about being research participants, emphasized their positive relationships with the researchers, and described participation as a meaningful activity. When research procedures threatened their sense of self, they were able to reason about risks and decline participation.

Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease, Research participation, Self, Support group
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-3553 (URN)10.1177/1054773816672671 (DOI)000423586200005 ()29374986 (PubMedID)
Note

Title in dissertation: Being a research participant with Alzheimer’s disease: Expressions of sense of self

Publication status in dissertation: Submitted

Available from: 2014-04-14 Created: 2014-04-14 Last updated: 2022-01-03Bibliographically approved
Österlind, J., Ternestedt, B.-M., Hansebo, G. & Hellström, I. (2017). Feeling lonely in an unfamiliar place: Older people's experiences of life close to death in a nursing home. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 12(1), 1-8, Article ID e12129.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeling lonely in an unfamiliar place: Older people's experiences of life close to death in a nursing home
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-8, article id e12129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of how older persons living in a nursing home experience life close to death.

Background: A move to and a life in a nursing home while being close to death is a reality for many older people in Sweden. Being able to express thoughts and feelings about death has been described as both crucial for sustaining personhood as well as for establishing a meaningful existence at the end of life. Important are the experiences of older people living in nursing homes who are approaching death.

Method: Six older people were interviewed on one to four occasions. A total of 16 interviews were conducted with the participants. An interpretative approach was chosen.

Findings: The main interpretation, Feeling lonely in an unfamiliar place, is based on three themes (i) Waiting for death, with the subthemes death as a release and thinking of oneself as dead; (ii) Subordinate oneself to values and norms of the staff, with the subthemes feeling offended and feeling trapped; and (iii) Keep the courage up. The older people's lives were characterised by feelings of aloneness in an unfamiliar place which contributed to a sense of existential loneliness. They experienced few opportunities to discuss their thoughts of life and death, including preparations for passing away.

Conclusion and implication for practice: It is of importance for professionals to be able to meet older people as they are and respect them as human beings in their transitions, before, during and after the move to a nursing home. It is important to find ways to support older people's wellbeing and identity near death.

Keywords
End-of-life care, Nursing Home, Older People, Palliative Care, Transition
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-592 (URN)10.1111/opn.12129 (DOI)27624362 (PubMedID)
Note

Publication Status in Dissertation: Manuscript

Title in Dissertation: Life close to death in a nursing home : older peoples experiences.

Available from: 2010-09-02 Created: 2010-09-02 Last updated: 2024-01-09Bibliographically approved
Söderlund, M., Cronqvist, A., Norberg, A., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Hansebo, G. (2016). Conversations between persons with dementia disease living in nursing homes and nurses: qualitative evaluation of an intervention with the validation method. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 30, 37-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conversations between persons with dementia disease living in nursing homes and nurses: qualitative evaluation of an intervention with the validation method
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2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Living with dementia disease (DD) can include difficulties describing experiences of everyday lives, which can lead to withdrawal, social isolation or existential homelessness. Persons with DD living in nursing homes are mainly dependent on the nurses for establishing and maintaining relationships with those around them. It can be challenging for nurses to understand what a person with DD is trying to express and to make themselves understood in turn. The validation method is intended to facilitate communication with persons with DD, but to our knowledge, there have been no qualitative studies of how this influences persons’ communication. This study aimed to illuminate the actions and reactions of persons with DD living in nursing homes in one-to-one conversations with nurses during 1 year of validation method training, as observed in videotapes. Four persons with DD were involved in videotaped conversations with four nurses who were participating in a validation method training programme. Videotapes with at least 5 months between the first and last recording were analysed and compared qualitatively. The findings are presented in four categories that were identified to various degrees in conversations at the beginning and at the end of the programme: being uninterested in or unable to answer questions, talking about more than one topic of conversation at the same time, trying to talk about what is on one’s mind and speaking more freely about what is on one’s mind. In the videotaped conversations at the end of the programme, the persons had the opportunity to use their remaining communication abilities. This may have been related to the development of the nurses’ communication skills during the training programme, and so it is possible that persons with DD could benefit from communicating with nurses trained in the validation method.

Keywords
Communication, Dementia disease, Validation method, Qualitative analysis of videotapes
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-4587 (URN)10.1111/scs.12219 (DOI)25919130 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 110046
Available from: 2015-04-30 Created: 2015-04-29 Last updated: 2023-11-17Bibliographically approved
Hedman, R., Hansebo, G., Ternestedt, B.-M., Hellström, I. & Norberg, A. (2016). Expressed Sense of Self by People With Alzheimer’s Disease in a Support Group Interpreted in Terms of Agency and Communion. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 35(4), 421-443
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expressed Sense of Self by People With Alzheimer’s Disease in a Support Group Interpreted in Terms of Agency and Communion
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 421-443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The self is constructed in cooperation with other people and social context influences how people perceive and express it. People with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) often receive insufficient support in constructing their preferred selves, but little is known about how they express themselves together with other people with AD. In accordance with Harré’s social constructionist theory of self, this study aimed to describe how five people with mild and moderate AD express their Self 2 (i.e., their personal attributes and life histories) in a support group with a facilitator experienced in communicating with people with AD. The participants’ expressions of their Self 2 were analyzed with qualitative abductive content analysis and interpreted in terms of agency and communion and a lack of agency and communion. The findings highlight the importance of supporting a sense of agency and communion when assisting people with AD in constructing their self.

Keywords
Self, Alzheimer’s disease, Agency, Communion, Support group
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-4805 (URN)10.1177/0733464814530804 (DOI)24776791 (PubMedID)
Note

Publication status in dissertation: In press

Title in dissertation: Sense of self expressed in terms of agency and communion by people with Alzheimer’s disease in a support group

Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-21 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Hedman, R., Hellström, I., Ternestedt, B.-M., Hansebo, G. & Norberg, A. (2014). Social positioning by people with Alzheimer's disease in a support group. Journal of Aging Studies, 28, 11-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social positioning by people with Alzheimer's disease in a support group
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 28, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Alzheimer's disease, Interaction, Personhood, Positioning, Self, Support group
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-2559 (URN)10.1016/j.jaging.2013.11.003 (DOI)24384363 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-12-18 Created: 2013-12-18 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Hansebo, G. & Kihlgren, M. (2014). The Wiley international handbook of supervision: Organizational change and supervision (1ed.). West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Wiley international handbook of supervision: Organizational change and supervision
2014 (English)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2014. p. 723 Edition: 1
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-4032 (URN)978-1-119-94332-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-09-11 Created: 2014-09-11 Last updated: 2023-01-04Bibliographically approved
Söderlund, M., Norberg, A. & Hansebo, G. (2014). Validation method training: nurses' experiences and ratings of work climate. International Journal of Older People Nursing, 9(1), 79-89
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation method training: nurses' experiences and ratings of work climate
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Training nursing staff in communication skills can impact on the quality of care for residents with dementia and contributes to nurses' job satisfaction. Changing attitudes and practices takes time and energy and can affect the entire nursing staff, not just the nurses directly involved in a training programme. Therefore, it seems important to study nurses' experiences of a training programme and any influence of the programme on work climate among the entire nursing staff.

Aims and objectives: To explore nurses' experiences of a 1-year validation method training programme conducted in a nursing home for residents with dementia and to describe ratings of work climate before and after the programme.

Design: A mixed-methods approach.

Methods: Twelve nurses participated in the training and were interviewed afterwards. These individual interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed, then analysed using qualitative content analysis. The Creative Climate Questionnaire was administered before (n = 53) and after (n = 56) the programme to the entire nursing staff in the participating nursing home wards and analysed with descriptive statistics.

Results: Analysis of the interviews resulted in four categories: being under extra strain, sharing experiences, improving confidence in care situations and feeling uncertain about continuing the validation method. The results of the questionnaire on work climate showed higher mean values in the assessment after the programme had ended.

Conclusion: The training strengthened the participating nurses in caring for residents with dementia, but posed an extra strain on them. These nurses also described an extra strain on the entire nursing staff that was not reflected in the results from the questionnaire. The work climate at the nursing home wards might have made it easier to conduct this extensive training programme.

Implications for practice: Training in the validation method could develop nurses' communication skills and improve their handling of complex care situations.

Keywords
Dementia care, Implementation study, Mixed-methods study, Validation method training, Work climate
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-2390 (URN)10.1111/opn.12027 (DOI)23601158 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-17 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Hedman, R., Hansebo, G., Ternestedt, B.-M., Hellström, I. & Norberg, A. (2013). How people with Alzheimer's disease express their sense of self: Analysis using Rom Harré's theory of selfhood. Dementia, 12(6), 713-733
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How people with Alzheimer's disease express their sense of self: Analysis using Rom Harré's theory of selfhood
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2013 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 713-733Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to use Harré’s social constructionist theory of selfhood to describe how people with mild and moderate Alzheimer’s disease (AD) express their sense of self. The findings show that Self 1, the embodied sense of being a person, was expressed fluently by participants through the use of first-person indexicals. Self 2, the experienced personal attributes and life narrative, had undergone changes. Those changes were not entirely for the worse; participants had also developed new skills in managing life with AD. In a lifetime perspective, those changes were minor and participants perceived themselves to be basically the same people that they were before having AD. When constructing Self 3, the social personae, participants usually described being supported by others, but sometimes described being exposed to malignant positioning. They also feared that they might become more exposed to negative attitudes as their AD progressed. However, participants were understanding towards the offensive behaviours of others.

Keywords
Alzheimer's disease, dementia, Rom Harré's social constructionist theory, identity, selfhood
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1710 (URN)10.1177/1471301212444053 (DOI)
Projects
Uttryck för upplevelse av identitet hos personer med Alzheimers sjukdom
Available from: 2012-09-17 Created: 2012-09-17 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Söderlund, M., Cronqvist, A., Norberg, A., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Hansebo, G. (2013). Nurses’ movements within and between various paths when improving their communication skills – an evaluation of validation method training. Open Journal of Nursing, 3(2), 265-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses’ movements within and between various paths when improving their communication skills – an evaluation of validation method training
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2013 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Training Communication Skills, Dementia Care, Validation Method, Qualitative Analysis of Videotapes
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-2394 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2013.32036 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-17 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Björkdahl, A., Hansebo, G. & Palmstierna, T. (2013). The influence of staff training on the violence prevention and management climate in psychiatric inpatient units. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 20(5)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of staff training on the violence prevention and management climate in psychiatric inpatient units
2013 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-2391 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2850.2012.01930.x (DOI)
Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-17 Last updated: 2021-11-29Bibliographically approved
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