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Benzein, Eva
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Bergdahl, E., Benzein, E., Ternestedt, B.-M., Elmberger, E. & Andershed, B. (2013). Co-creating possibilities for patients in palliative care to reach vital goals: A multiple case study of home-care nursing encounters. Nursing Inquiry, 20(4), 341-351
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-creating possibilities for patients in palliative care to reach vital goals: A multiple case study of home-care nursing encounters
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2013 (English)In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 341-351Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The patient's home is a common setting for palliative care. This means that we need to understand current palliative care philosophy and how its goals can be realized in home-care nursing encounters (HCNEs) between the nurse, patient and patient's relatives. The existing research on this topic describes both a negative and a positive perspective. There has, however, been a reliance on interview and descriptive methods in this context. The aim of this study was to explore planned HCNEs in palliative care. The design was a multiple case study based on observations. The analysis includes a descriptive and an explanation building phase. The results show that planned palliative HCNEs can be described as a process of co-creating possibilities for the patient to reach vital goals through shared knowledge in a warm and caring atmosphere, based on good caring relations. However, in some HCNEs, co-creation did not occur: Wishes and needs were discouraged or made impossible and vital goals were not reached for the patients or their relatives. Further research is needed to understand why. The co-creative process presented in this article can be seen as a concretization of the palliative care ideal of working with a person-centered approach.

Keywords
case study research, home care, nurse–patient interaction, nurse–patient relationships, palliative care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-2428 (URN)10.1111/nin.12022 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-09-30 Created: 2013-09-30 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Henriksson (Alvariza), A., Årestedt, K., Benzein, E., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Andershed, B. (2013). Effects of a support group programme for patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care. Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, 27(3), 257-264
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a support group programme for patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care
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2013 (English)In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Several studies show that family members report a lack of preparation, knowledge and the ability to handle the caregiver role, and a need for information and psychosocial support. 

AIM: The aim was to investigate the effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care.

DESIGN: A prospective quasi-experimental design, including an intervention group and a comparison group, was used.

SETTINGS/PARTICIPANTS: A support group programme was offered to family members during ongoing palliative care at three intervention settings: two specialist palliative care units and one haematology unit. A fourth setting, a specialist palliative care unit, was used for comparisons.

RESULTS: Family members taking part in the support group programme significantly increased their perceptions of preparedness for caregiving, competence for caregiving, and rewards of caregiving. Hope, anxiety, depression symptoms and health showed no significant changes.

CONCLUSIONS: The intervention, including a support group programme delivered to family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care, proved to be effective in certain domains of caregiving. No negative outcomes were detected. The results indicate that this intervention could be implemented and delivered to family members during ongoing palliative care.

Keywords
Palliative care, Family members, Intervention, Support groups
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1867 (URN)10.1177/0269216312446103 (DOI)22562965 (PubMedID)
Note

Published online before print May 4.

Available from: 2012-12-20 Created: 2012-12-20 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Henriksson (Alvariza), A., Andershed, B., Benzein, E. & Årestedt, K. (2012). Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in a sample of Swedish family members of patients with life-threatening illness. Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, 26(7), 930-938
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in a sample of Swedish family members of patients with life-threatening illness
2012 (English)In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 930-938Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Family members often take on many caring responsibilities, with complex issues and challenges to consider. Feelings of preparedness, competence and reward are identified as concepts that may protect caregiver wellbeing and decrease negative outcomes related to caregiving.

AIM: This study aimed to translate, adapt and psychometrically evaluate the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in Swedish family members of patients with life threatening illness.

DESIGN: Correlational.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The study took place in four settings including advanced palliative care. The scales were tested in a sample of 125 family members of persons with life-threatening illness. All three scales were tested in relation to distribution of item and scale scores, missing data patterns, dimensionality, convergent validity and reliability.

RESULTS: The results in this study indicate that the Swedish versions of The Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale are valid, reliable and user-friendly scales. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the scales were unidimensional and all demonstrated Cronbach's alpha values of ≥0.9.

CONCLUSIONS: As a result of this study it is anticipated that the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale could provide a basis for collaborative research between different countries and make international studies more comparable and generalizable despite differences in language and culture.

Keywords
Family caregivers, Life-threatening illness, Psychometric evaluation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1321 (URN)10.1177/0269216311419987 (DOI)21908520 (PubMedID)
Note

Published online before print September 9, 2011.

Available from: 2011-10-27 Created: 2011-10-27 Last updated: 2021-12-17Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, E., Benzein, E., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Andershed, B. (2011). Developing nurses’ way to reflect over caring relationships through clinical supervision with a structured reflection; an action research approach. Nursing Inquiry, 18(2), 111-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing nurses’ way to reflect over caring relationships through clinical supervision with a structured reflection; an action research approach
2011 (English)In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1315 (URN)
Available from: 2011-10-27 Created: 2011-10-27 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Henriksson (Alvariza), A., Benzein, E., Ternestedt, B.-M. & Andershed, B. (2011). Meeting the needs of family members of persons with life threatening illness: a support group programme during ongoing palliative care. Palliative & Supportive Care, 9(3), 263-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting the needs of family members of persons with life threatening illness: a support group programme during ongoing palliative care
2011 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1320 (URN)10.1017/S1478951511000216 (DOI)21838947 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-10-27 Created: 2011-10-27 Last updated: 2021-04-12Bibliographically approved
Wallerstedt, B., Benzein, E. & Andershed, B. (2011). Sharing living and dying - a balancing act between vulnerability and a sense of security: Enrolled nurses’ experiences of working in the sitting service for dying patients at home. Palliative & Supportive Care, 9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sharing living and dying - a balancing act between vulnerability and a sense of security: Enrolled nurses’ experiences of working in the sitting service for dying patients at home
2011 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-1317 (URN)doi:10.1017/S1478951511000241 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-10-27 Created: 2011-10-27 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Benzein, E., Hagberg, M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2009). Familj och sociala relationer. In: Febe Friberg och Joakim Öhlén (Ed.), Omvårdnadens grunder: perspektiv och förhållningssätt (pp. 67-88). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Familj och sociala relationer
2009 (Swedish)In: Omvårdnadens grunder: perspektiv och förhållningssätt / [ed] Febe Friberg och Joakim Öhlén, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 67-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2009
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-561 (URN)978-91-44-04906-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Söderström, I.-M. K., Saveman, B.-I., Hagberg, M. S. & Benzein, E. G. (2009). Family adaptation in relation to a family member's stay in ICU.. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 25(5), 250-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family adaptation in relation to a family member's stay in ICU.
2009 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 250-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To describe and interpret the family adaptation during the ICU hospitalisation and up to 18 months after discharge. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY/DESIGN: A qualitative design was chosen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Individual and family interviews with eight families including 31 family members. A hermeneutical analysis was performed and paradigm cases were constructed. RESULTS: The result is presented in three themes: striving for endurance, striving for consolation and striving to rebuild life under new conditions. The family adaptation started at the onset of the critical incident and continued during the ICU stay and after discharge. The family members metaphorically went through peaks and valleys during the whole process of adaptation. CONCLUSION: Adaptation is an issue for the whole family and is facilitated by being able to stay close to the patient and receive supportive unambiguous information from the staff both during the ICU stay and after discharge.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-396 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2009.06.006 (DOI)19628390 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-06-29 Created: 2010-06-29 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Benzein, E. G., Hagberg, M. & Saveman, B.-I. (2008). 'Being appropriately unusual': a challenge for nurses in health-promoting conversations with families. Nursing Inquiry, 15(2), 106-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Being appropriately unusual': a challenge for nurses in health-promoting conversations with families
2008 (English)In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 106-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study describes the theoretical assumptions and the application for health-promoting conversations, as a communication tool for nurses when talking to patients and their families. The conversations can be used on a promotional, preventive and healing level when working with family-focused nursing. They are based on a multiverse, salutogenetic, relational and reflecting approach, and acknowledge each person's experience as equally valid, and focus on families' resources, and the relationship between the family and its environment. By posing reflective questions, reflection is made possible for both the family and the nurses. Family members are invited to tell their story, and they can listen to and learn from each other. Nurses are challenged to build a co-creating partnership with families in order to acknowledge them as experts on how to lead their lives and to use their own expert knowledge in order to facilitate new meanings to surface. In this way, family health can be enhanced.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-405 (URN)10.1111/j.1440-1800.2008.00401.x (DOI)18476853 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-06-30 Created: 2010-06-30 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Benzein, E., Johansson, P., Arestedt, K. F., Berg, A. & Saveman, B.-I. (2008). Families' Importance in Nursing Care: Nurses' Attitudes--an instrument development. Journal of Family Nursing, 14(1), 97-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Families' Importance in Nursing Care: Nurses' Attitudes--an instrument development
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2008 (English)In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 97-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article describes the development and testing of a research instrument, Families' Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA), designed to measure nurses' attitudes about the importance of involving families in nursing care. The instrument was inductively developed from a literature review and tested with a sample of Swedish nurses. An item-total correlation and a first principal component analysis were used to validate the final instrument, including a second principal component analysis to analyze dimensionality, and Cronbach's alpha was used to estimate internal consistency. The instrument consists of 26 items and reveals four factors: families as a resource in nursing care, family as a conversational partner, family as a burden, and family as its own resource. Cronbach's alpha was 0.88 for the total instrument and 0.69 to 0.80 for the subscales. The instrument requires further testing with other nurse populations.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-406 (URN)10.1177/1074840707312716 (DOI)18281645 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-06-30 Created: 2010-06-30 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
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