Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Maintaining everyday life in a family with a dying parent: Teenagers' experiences of adapting to responsibility.
Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Ersta sjukhus, Stockholm.
Lunds universitet.
Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Ersta sjukhus, Capio Geriatrik Dalen, Stockholm..
2015 (English)In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 6, 1595-1601 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Teenagers are living through a turbulent period in their development, when they are breaking away from the family to form their own identities, and so they are particularly vulnerable to the stressful situation of having a parent affected by a progressive and incurable illness. The current study sought to gain more knowledge about the ways that teenagers themselves describe living in a family with a seriously ill and dying parent. More specifically, the aims were to describe how teenagers are emotionally affected by everyday life in a family with a dying parent and to determine how they attempt to adapt to this situation.

METHOD: The study employed a descriptive and interpretive design using qualitative content analysis. A total of 10 teenagers (aged 14-19 years, 7 boys and 3 girls) participated through repeated, individual, informal interviews that were carried out as free-ranging conversations.

RESULTS: While contending with their own vulnerable developmental period of life, the teenagers were greatly affected by their parent's illness and took on great responsibility for supporting their parents and siblings, and for maintaining family life. Lacking sufficient information and support left them rather unprepared, having to guess and to interpret the vague signs of failing health on their own, with feelings of uncertainty and loneliness as a consequence.

SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Support from healthcare professionals should be designed to help and encourage parents to have open communications about their illness with their teenaged children. Our results add further support to the literature, reinforcing the need for an approach that uses a systemic perspective and considers the family to be the appropriate unit of care and offers a suitable support system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 13, no 6, 1595-1601 p.
Keyword [en]
Dying, Palliative care, Parent, Qualitative, Teenagers
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-5493DOI: 10.1017/S1478951515000085PubMedID: 25800062OAI: oai:DiVA.org:esh-5493DiVA: diva2:1047354
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2017-01-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
By organisation
Palliative Research Centre, PRC
In the same journal
Palliative & Supportive Care
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 10 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf