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The meaning of caring for patients on a long-term psychiatric ward as narrated by formal care providers
Mittuniversitetet & Umeå universitet.
Mittuniversitetet & University of Tromsø, Norway.
College of Nursing, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, USA.
Umeå universitet.
1998 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 5, no 4, 255-264 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seventeen care providers were interviewed about their caring experiences on a hospital psychiatric ward. The interviews focused on the meaning of their work, including the care they provide and the nature of the patient as a person. The study was guided by a phenomenological hermeneutic perspective inspired by Ricoeur (1976). The analysis focused on context and form. Three themes illuminate the meaning of care provided. These themes are as follows; being in the midst of human storage, moving towards a human care of relations, and struggling with 'the old' and 'the new'. Experiencing work as being in the midst of a human storage reflects the historical and human situation of warehousing psychiatric patients. The care providers are experiencing a shift in their view of the patient and the meaning of their work, towards a more human care of relations. For these care providers, there is a struggle between the past, the present and the future. This struggle between 'the old' and 'the new' conveys a struggle between doing as a nurse, which dominates the past, and relating, which is, or needs to be, the current and future focus in psychiatric care. The shift in view distinguished itself by the care providers viewing the patient as being vulnerable and having problems with relations. The results have been interpreted and discussed in the light of a previously published interview study with the patients, carried out at the same time on the same ward. Attending to ingrained attitudes of the past and their influence on new approaches to care is essential to understanding not only changes in ways of doing nursing tasks, but also ways of relating.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1998. Vol. 5, no 4, 255-264 p.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-5576DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2850.1998.00138.xPubMedID: 9807362OAI: oai:DiVA.org:esh-5576DiVA: diva2:1057269
Available from: 2010-02-23 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2016-12-16Bibliographically approved

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