Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Encountering the older confused patient: professional carers' experiences 
Mälardalens högskola.
Mälardalens högskola.
2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 4, 515-522 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study's rationale: Confusion is a common condition among older patients and often a fearful experience. Opinions vary as to how to communicate with and care for confused patients and professional carers often find the patients' situation almost as distressing as the patients' themselves do.

Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to describe professional carers' experiences of their encounters with older confused patients.

Methodological design and justification: Data was collected from interviews with 10 professional carers working on a ward specializing in the care of older confused patients. A descriptive phenomenological research approach was used to gather knowledge of professional carers' experiences of encounters with older confused patients.

Ethical issues and approval: A Regional Board of Research Ethics granted ethical permission for the study. The appropriate ethical principles were followed. The participants were contacted personally and received a letter providing information on the study. Written consent was requested before the interview. If needed, the participants were able to get in contact with the staff health service for a follow-up after the interview. Names or places have been changed in order to ensure confidentiality.

Results: The encounter with the confused patient is experienced as an encounter with an unfamiliar person, where the patients' actions and words are unforeseeable and with a lack of immediate trust. The essential meaning is further illuminated by the meaning constituents: the unforeseeable encounter, always being on guard and using oneself as a tool.

Relevance to clinical practice: This paper focuses on the importance of encouraging professional carers to pay attention to the complexity of the encounter with the confused patient, reflecting upon their own behaviour within these encounters and the importance of knowledge of the patient's preferred senses and life stories. Caring for confused patients involves a great responsibility where both the professional carers and the patients are vulnerable and exposed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 21, no 4, 515-522 p.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-58DOI: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2007.00505.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:esh-58DiVA: diva2:317276
Available from: 2010-05-03 Created: 2010-05-03 Last updated: 2011-05-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sandberg, JonasFagerberg, Ingegerd
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 89 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf