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A randomized study of computerized working memory training and effects on functioning in everyday life for patients with brain injury
Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2194-6773
Rehabiliteringsmedicin, Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset, Rehabiliteringsmedicin, Göteborg.
Rehabiliteringsmedicin, Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
2013 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 27, no 13-14, 1658-1665 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Working memory (WM) problems influence most activities of daily living. The aim was to evaluate if computerized working memory training after brain injury has a significant effect on functioning in daily life. Method: Outpatients with WM deficits, aged 22-63 years, were randomized to either intervention group (IG, n = 20) or control group (CG, n = 18) and received 5 weeks standard rehabilitation. The IG also received WM training with the Cogmed QM training program. Assessments were made before (A1), immediately (A2) and 3 months (A3) after intervention. After follow-up, the CG was offered the computerized training and assessed after this (A4; n = 8). Assessments included the WAIS-III Digit span reversed, Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS), Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test-II (RBMT-II) and a WM questionnaire. Results: The IG improved on digit span and FIS, A1-A2, and significantly more than the CG on the WM questionnaire, A1-A3. Both groups improved in AMPS motor skill and the AMPS process skill score tended towards significant improvement in the IG, from A1-A3. After training (A3-A4), the CG improved in digit span and RBMT-II. Conclusion: The WM training seems to have a generalized effect on functional activity and lessens fatigue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 27, no 13-14, 1658-1665 p.
Keyword [en]
Fatigue, Functional activity, Generalization, Rehabilitation, Working memory
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-2539DOI: 10.3109/02699052.2013.830196PubMedID: 24131298OAI: oai:DiVA.org:esh-2539DiVA: diva2:684127
Available from: 2014-01-07 Created: 2013-12-17 Last updated: 2017-06-08Bibliographically approved

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