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A population-level study of place of death and associated factors in Sweden
Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Göteborgs universitet.
Karolinska institutet.
Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Ghent University, Brussels, Belgium .
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 7, 744-751 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aims of this study were to examine, on a population level, where people die in Sweden, and to investigate associations between place of death and underlying cause of death, socioeconomic and environmental characteristics, with a particular interest in people dying from life-limiting conditions typically in need of palliative care. Methods: This population-level study is based on death certificate data for all deceased individuals in Sweden in 2012, with a registered place of death (n=83,712). Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate associations between place of death and individual, socioeconomic and environmental characteristics. Results: The results show that, in 2012, 42.1% of all deaths occurred in hospitals, 17.8% occurred at home and 38.1% in nursing home facilities. Individuals dying of conditions indicative of potential palliative care needs were less likely to die in hospital than those dying of other conditions (OR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.70–0.77). Living at home in urban areas was associated with higher likelihood of dying in hospital or in a nursing home (OR = 1.04 and 1.09 respectively). Educational attainment and marital status were found to be somewhat associated with the place of death. Conclusions: The majority of deaths in Sweden occur in institutional settings, with comparatively larger proportions of nursing home deaths than most countries. Associations between place of death and other variables point to inequalities in availability and/or utilization of health services at the end of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 43, no 7, 744-751 p.
Keyword [en]
Death certificates, Sweden, Health care disparities, Palliative care, Place of death, Policy, Population, Public health, Socioeconomic factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-4900DOI: 10.1177/1403494815595774PubMedID: 26194351OAI: oai:DiVA.org:esh-4900DiVA: diva2:867225
Available from: 2015-11-05 Created: 2015-11-05 Last updated: 2015-12-02Bibliographically approved

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