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Unresolved grief in a national sample of bereaved parents: Impaired mental and physical health 4 to 9 years later.
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2008 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 26, no 36, 5870-5876 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To assess unresolved parental grief, the associated long-term impact on mental and physical health, and health service use.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: This anonymous, mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August 2001 and October 2001. Four hundred forty-nine parents who lost a child as a result of cancer 4 to 9 years earlier completed the survey (response rate, 80%). One hundred ninety-one (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers, and 251 (56%) were mothers. Bereaved parents were asked whether or not, and to what extent, they had worked through their grief. They were also asked about their physical and psychological well-being. For outcomes of interest, we report relative risk (RR) with 95% CIs as well as unadjusted odds ratios and adjusted odds ratios.

RESULTS: Parents with unresolved grief reported significantly worsening psychological health (fathers: RR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.4; mothers: RR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.9 to 4.4) and physical health (fathers: RR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.8 to 4.4; mothers: RR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 3.3) compared with those who had worked through their grief. Fathers with unresolved grief also displayed a significantly higher risk of sleep difficulties (RR, 6.7; 95% CI, 2.5 to 17.8). Mothers, however, reported increased visits with physicians during the previous 5 years (RR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.6) as well as a greater likelihood of taking sick leave when they had not worked through their grief (RR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.5).

CONCLUSION: Parents who have not worked through their grief are at increased risk of long-term mental and physical morbidity, increased health service use, and increased sick leave.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 26, no 36, 5870-5876 p.
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Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-5116DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2007.14.6738PubMedID: 19029425OAI: oai:DiVA.org:esh-5116DiVA: diva2:909044
Available from: 2016-03-04 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2016-03-04Bibliographically approved

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Kreicbergs, Ulrika C
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CiteExportLink to record
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