Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Long-term psychosocial outcomes among bereaved siblings of children with cancer.
USA.
USA.
USA.
Karolinska institutet, Sophiahemmet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8185-781X
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, ISSN 0885-3924, E-ISSN 1873-6513, Vol. 49, no 1, 55-65 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

CONTEXT: The death of a child from cancer affects the entire family. Little is known about the long-term psychosocial outcomes of bereaved siblings.

OBJECTIVES: To describe 1) the prevalence of risky health behaviors, psychological distress, and social support among bereaved siblings and 2) potentially modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes.

METHODS: Bereaved siblings were eligible for this dual-center, cross-sectional, survey-based study if they were 16 years or older and their parents had enrolled in one of three prior studies about caring for children with cancer at the end of life. Linear regression models identified associations between personal perspectives before, during, and after the family's cancer experience and outcomes (health behaviors, psychological distress, and social support).

RESULTS: Fifty-eight siblings completed surveys (62% response rate). They were approximately 12 years bereaved, with a mean age of 26 years at the time of the survey (SD 7.8). Anxiety, depression, and illicit substance use increased during the year after their brother/sister's death but then returned to baseline. Siblings who reported dissatisfaction with communication, poor preparation for death, missed opportunities to say goodbye, and/or a perceived negative impact of the cancer experience on relationships tended to have higher distress and lower social support scores (P < 0.001-0.031). Almost all siblings reported that their loss still affected them; half stated that the experience impacted current educational and career goals.

CONCLUSION: How siblings experience the death of a child with cancer may impact their long-term psychosocial well-being. Sibling-directed communication and concurrent supportive care during the cancer experience and the year after the sibling death may mitigate poor long-term outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 49, no 1, 55-65 p.
Keyword [en]
Bereavement, Siblings, Pediatric cancer, Psychological distress, Resilience, Psychosocial outcomes, Survivorship
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:esh:diva-5161PubMedID: 24880001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:esh-5161DiVA: diva2:915163
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2016-03-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

PubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kreicbergs, Ulrika
In the same journal
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 47 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf