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  • 1.
    Bergman, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Social Sciences.
    Supported Visitation in Cases of Violence: Political Intentions and Local Practice in Sweden2018In: International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, ISSN 1360-9939, E-ISSN 1464-3707, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 374-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, supervised visitation has been replaced with a new measure called supported visitation. In the reform process, it was emphasized that if face to face visitation cannot be organized without risk for the child, indirect visitation or no visitation are to be considered better options. The aim of this article is to explore social work practice regarding supported visitation in cases involving violence. It draws on a study of a local visitation centre and the data consists of case files from the social services regarding 37 children where a court ordered visitation support, interviews with seven members of staff, ten parents and three children, and local documents and guidelines. For 18 of the 37 children, case files contained credible information about a history of violence. The study shows that district courts sometimes order visitation support in cases where there is a risk for the child and where in the near future normalization of visitation is unlikely. Thus, the measure of visitation support is sometimes used in a way that was not intended. Regarding social work practice, the analysis indicates that, although the guidelines developed at the local support centre under study adhere to the national policy intentions, both professionals’ validation and invalidation of violence can be seen. For service users previously subjected to violence, the documented court and social services’ practices may actively contribute to children’s and residential parents’ continued vulnerability.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Uppsala universitet.
    Contact, shared parenting, and violence: children as witnesses of domestic violence in Sweden2011In: International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, ISSN 1360-9939, E-ISSN 1464-3707, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 165-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As in many other countries in the West, Swedish policy and law presupposes shared parenting and a high degree of parental co-operation after separation or divorce. Parents are expected to share the legal responsibility for the child and face-to-face contact is presumed to be in the best interests of the child. It was not until the new millennium that intimate partner violence was placed upon the policy agenda to any greater extent in the field of family law. The legislation has recently been revised with the aim of ensuring a higher degree of safety for both abused parents and children. The re-definition of children exposed to violence as crime victims seems to be a key to these changes. In many ways, the development regarding intimate partner violence represents a significant change of direction in Swedish policy in the area of family law. However, it is argued that policy makers need to pay more attention to the implementation of safety-oriented reforms. The discussion demonstrates how three social positions available for children in this context – the witness, the victim, and the competent participant – form a relational pattern full of tensions that creates challenges for everyday professional practice. The article highlights how the ambiguity in the perspective on children, constructing them as both ‘becomings’ and ‘beings’ may undermine policy intentions to create a higher degree of safety in the field of family law for this particular group of vulnerable children.

  • 3.
    Schiratzki, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet. Juridiska fakulteten..
    Best interests of the child in the Swedish Aliens Act2000In: International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, ISSN 1360-9939, E-ISSN 1464-3707, no 14, p. 206-225Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Schiratzki, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet. Juridiska fakulteten.
    Friends at odds: Construing Habitual Residence for Children in Sweden and the United States2001In: International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, ISSN 1360-9939, E-ISSN 1464-3707, no 15, p. 297-326Article in journal (Other academic)
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