Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Social Sciences, Avdelningen för forskning om det civila samhället.
    Markström, Urban
    Umeå universitet.
    Non-profit organizations in mental health: their roles as seen in research2012In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 287-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-profit organizations (NPO) for mental health are becoming significant actors. Here, their roles in welfare society as understood in research are identified and analyzed. Results from recent research publications on the mental health field are synthesized and categorized in order to find out their origin, theoretical orientation, and view on mental health NPO’s in relation to the public welfare systems. Relevant publications are primarily from the US, empirically oriented, and addressing surveys on both individual and organizational level. NPOs were most often seen as consensus-oriented service organizations, while very few (4%) were seen as conflict-oriented advocates (i.e., anti-professional). It is concluded that these NPOs are most often studied as complements or alternatives to existing public welfare services rather than on their own terms, and that research on the topic lacks more complex theoretical attempts.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Social Sciences.
    Vamstad, Johan
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Social Sciences.
    New Deeds for New Needs: Civil Society Action Against Poverty in Sweden2018In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of new types and new levels of poverty in Sweden has spurred civil society organizations to take a more active role in domestic relief work. Their work is not least directed toward groups of poor with limited access to public welfare in Sweden, in most cases because they are not Swedish citizens. The arrival of groups like the vulnerable EU citizens and undocumented refugees has created a situation where civil society provides emergency relief for groups not eligible for long-term relief from the public sector. A new division of responsibility between civil society and the public sector is therefore being formed, and this division can be explained in terms of rights; the aid organizations are guided by the principles of human rights, while the public sector functions primarily according to social citizenship rights. This article documents the work of the Swedish City Missions, a large aid organization that has become an important actor in poverty relief work in Sweden. A never before conducted survey of 137,000 interventions performed by the Swedish City Missions gives an entirely new insight into the significance of civil society organizations in combating new and old types of poverty in Sweden. Which groups receive which types of aid and what does that tell us about the roles of civil society and the public sector in a rights perspective? The findings show that civil society organizations like the City Missions play a far from marginal role in the Swedish welfare state.

  • 3.
    Lundberg, Erik
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Toward a New Social Contract?: The Participation of Civil Society in Swedish Welfare Policymaking, 1958–20122017In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contribution to current debates on the changing roles and responsibilities of civil society in welfare state arrangements, I examined the participation of various types of civil society organizations in national welfare policymaking in Sweden between 1958 and 2012. Drawing upon an extensive dataset of over 1400 civil society, state, and for-profit organizations, I tested three claims related to the role and responsibility of civil society in the governance of welfare: the changing balance between corporatist and welfare organizations, the shift from voice to service, and another shift from nonprofit organizations to FPOs. My results revealed weak but emerging trends aligned with changing patterns of corporatism and the marketization of Sweden’s welfare system. However, support for any shift from voice to service remains uncertain.

  • 4.
    Markström, Urban
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Social Sciences, Avdelningen för forskning om det civila samhället.
    Towards Hybridization: The Roles of Swedish Non-Profit Organizations Within Mental Health2013In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 917-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many parts of the Western world, interventions for people with mental illness have radically changed in recent decades. In the deinstitutionalized system of today, the role for non-profit organizations is generally characterized by dual goals: political advocacy and service provision. Here, the role and function of the user movement in the Swedish mental health system is examined through a case study of all local branches of the largest non-profit organization within the Swedish mental health field. The empirical material consisted of annual reports from all local branches, and was analysed through two analytical schemes, concerning voice/service and conflict/consensus. The analysis pointed to a user movement that still retained the basic ideas of peer support and mutual aid, but were also increasingly being asked by formal service providers to represent the need of users. A hybrid organization category, a ‘Social Movement Peer Organization’, was identified that where social recreational activities are combined with local political advocacy.

  • 5.
    Vamstad, Johan
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Institute for Civil Society Studies.
    Co-Production and Service Quality: The Case of Cooperative Childcare in Sweden2012In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 23, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares results from a study of service quality in cooperative and municipal preschools. The parent cooperative and municipal childcare represents two different schools of thought with regard to service quality. The municipal services have a strong tradition of professionalism in which user participation is not allowed to interfere with the qualified work performed by trained professionals. The parent cooperatives have another tradition in which service quality is developed in a dialogue between users and staff while they co-produce the services together. The former tradition is the dominant one in the Swedish welfare state while the latter is an exception. The conclusion of the article is that service quality is better in the parent cooperative childcare in spite of the widespread assumption in Sweden that service quality is close to synonymous with professionalism.

  • 6.
    von Essen, Johan
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Social Sciences.
    The Shifting Meanings of Popular Engagement in Swedish Society2019In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to contribute to the Swedish debate on popular engagement by studying changes in popular engagement in Swedish society, and particularly look for processes of depoliticisation and politicisation since the beginning of the 1990s, by asking, has popular engagement been depoliticised since the beginning of the 1990s? Popular engagement has historically had different roles and fulfilled different functions; consequently, it is a societal phenomenon with several and competing significances due to varying dominant discourses framing the understanding of popular engagement and structuring the actions of engaged citizens. Obviously, the present composite of popular engagement in Swedish society reflects Swedish history and the various present forms of engagement can be conceived as historical layers. How popular engagement has been framed, valued and understood through history is an indication of what is supposed to be needed and feasible in a particular society at a certain time. This gives popular engagement symbolic meaning that renders it political significance and power that can be studied in cultural history. The article offers a brief historical review of the symbolic meanings of popular engagement in Swedish society from the breakthrough of modernity until the present times, and it demonstrates that it has not had a fixed significance over the years. Particular attention is given to an on-going subtle change of meaning of popular engagement occurring in contemporary Swedish society. This process implies a break with the popular mass movement tradition.

  • 7.
    Wallman Lundåsen, Susanne
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Social Sciences, Avdelningen för forskning om det civila samhället.
    Voluntary Associations within the Local Political ContextIn: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Åberg, Pelle
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Social Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Institute for Civil Society Studies.
    Managing expectations, demands and myths: Swedish study associations caught between civil society, the state and the market2013In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 537-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several challenges, external and internal, to the identity and position of civil society organizations exist today. Organizations may be tempted or coerced into closer cooperation with the state. There are also incentives to become more market oriented. This article deals with such struggles in Swedish study associations and how these organizations attempt to gain legitimacy. The tradition of the organization is an important legitimating aspect and so is efficiency. These two aspects can complement each other but may also collide. The article demonstrates how civil society organizations handle an influx of market logics and trends of professionalization when these clash with a civil society identity. The findings indicate that different isomorphic processes are at work. Cultural resources are used to handle conflicting myths, leading to varied discursive strategies and incidences of decoupling.

  • 9.
    Åberg, Pelle
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Centre for Civil Society Research.
    Einarsson, Stefan
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Reuter, Marta
    Stockholms universitet.
    Think Tanks: New Organizational Actors in a Changing Swedish Civil Society2019In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy institutes, or ‘‘think tanks’’, are becoming increasingly ubiquitous in our societies. In this article, we conceptualize think tanks explicitly as a civil society phenomenon, linking the proliferation of this relatively new type of actor to the transformation of civil society structures and of systems of interest representation. Using the case of Sweden as an illustration, we argue that the recent decades’ rise of think tanks in institutional settings outside of the USA can only be understood if we take into account the particular features and institutional policy access opportunities of the domestic civil society in each national case, and that think tanks should be analytically understood as the allies of, rather than competitors to, the older, established forces in civil society. 

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf