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  • 1.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet, Stiftelsen Stockholms sjukhem.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Tishelman, Carol
    Fürst, Carl Johan
    Nurses' experiences of clinical use of a quality of life instrument in palliative care.2007In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This pilot study explored how nursing staff experienced clinical use of a quality of life (QoL) instrument as complement to their standard assessment interview. Twenty-six of 36 Registered Nurses working in one palliative care service responded in writing to six open questions.We found that nurses described positive features in using the QoL instrument related to how it supported their professional role, eased therapeutic contact with patients, and in terms of the outcomes of its use. Others noted difficulties incorporating the tool into the framework of their traditional nursing assessment, noting instrument and situation-specific limitations, with attitudes and comfort with the questionnaire affecting its use. Clinical use of QoL tools may be facilitated by emphasizing their role as a first screening assessment, and acknowledging and supporting the importance of clinical expertise and the patient-nurse relationship in further more focussed assessments and nursing care.

  • 2. Jakobsson, E
    et al.
    Bergh, I
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Göteborgs universitet.
    The turning point: Identifying end-of-life care in everyday health-care practice2007In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 107-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Mattsson, Karin
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Mälardalens högskola.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Teaching gerontology in globalized academics: a qualitative study of Thai nursing students' views on ageing when studying abroad.2017In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Negative views towards ageing and older adults may be a reason why nurses do not choose to work in gerontological nursing. Studying in another cultural context can challenge these views. The Objective was to explore nursing students' views on ageing and older adults before and after a gerontology course held abroad.

    DESIGN AND METHOD: A qualitative approach based on content analysis of responses to open-ended questions by 30 Thai nursing students studying a gerontology course in Sweden.

    RESULTS: Three main categories: positive imprints of ageing, ageing takes its toll, and knowledge leading to action, emerged through sub-categories carrying a view of older adults as not only in need of care, but also as resourceful and competent. Professional healthcare, besides family was seen as potential caregivers in old age.

    CONCLUSIONS: Studying gerontology abroad can widen views towards ageing and older adults, inspiring nurses to work in gerontological nursing.

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  • 4.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Palliative care and vulnerability of self2007In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 47-8Article in journal (Other academic)
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