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  • 1.
    Berg, Linda
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Nolbris, Margaretha Jenholt
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Koinberg, Ingalill
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Möller, Anders
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Social Sciences. Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Characterisation of cancer support and rehabilitation programmes: a Swedish multiple case study.2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, article id TONURSJ-8-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer support and rehabilitation are suggested to be an integral part of cancer care strategies. This study focuses on comparativeness of cancer support and rehabilitation programmes. The aim of this study was to analyse available cancer support and rehabilitation programmes in Sweden presented as complementary to cancer rehabilitation at cancer clinics. A multiple case study design was chosen in order to inquire the small number of existing supportive and rehabilitative cancer programmes. Based on the structures, processes and outcomes of the nine included programmes, three types of cancer support and rehabilitation programmes were identified: multimodal rehabilitation, comprehensive cancer support and art therapy. Cancer support and rehabilitation programmes offer a variety of activities and therapies which are highly valuable and relevant for people with cancer. The typology of cancer support and rehabilitation programmes and comparability between programmes need further inquiry.

  • 2.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Department of Neurobiology, Care science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Department of Oncology/Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Stord Haugesund University College, Norway.
    Henrikssen, Eva
    Department of Neurobiology, Care science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, FOUnu, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Department of Neurobiology, Care science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholms Sjukhem foundation, Research, Development and Education Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers’ views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care.

    Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviewswere conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes.

    The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested.

  • 3.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Henriksen, Eva
    Karolinska institutet.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    First-line managers’ views on leadership and palliative care in Swedish nursing homes2014In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 8, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers' views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes. The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested.

  • 4. Høgsnes, Linda
    et al.
    Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf
    Danielson, Ella
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    The Shift in Existential Life Situations of Adult Children to Parents with Dementia Relocated to Nursing Homes.2016In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 10, p. 122-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous research describes spouses and adult children of people with dementia as a homogeneous group using one term: family caregivers. Recent research shows that the needs and experiences of spouses and adult children differ, therefore they cannot be studied as a homogeneous group.

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to describe the shift in existential life situations of adult children of a parent with dementia relocated to nursing homes.

    DESIGN: This is a qualitative study with an interpretive approach.

    METHODS: Face-to-face interviews were held with 11 adult children aged 48-65 years. The interviews lasted 30-60 minutes and data were analysed using interpretive content analysis.

    FINDINGS: The adult children described how they experienced their life situation before and after their parents' relocation. Before relocation they described feelings of powerlessness, loneliness in their responsibilities, loss and guilt. After relocation they had feelings of freedom, ongoing responsibility, living with loss and having a new relationship with death.

    CONCLUSION: The most important finding in our study was that adult children developed a different relationship with death than before the parent became affected by dementia. It is essential that healthcare staff understand and address the adult children's existential life situations and the suffering they are experiencing. Healthcare staff need to be conscious about adult children's needs for support to address their existential life situations before and after their parents relocate to nursing homes.

  • 5.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Strang, Susann
    Browall, Maria
    Living in the presence of death: an integrative literature review of relatives' important existential concerns when caring for a severely ill family member.2012In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 6, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to explore relatives' existential concerns when caring for a seriously ill family member as well as to describe interventions that meet these concerns.

    METHODS: In this integrative literature review we assessed and classified 17 papers, 12 qualitative and 5 quantitative. Literature was sought in the databases Cinahl, PubMed, Psykinfo and Web of Science in September 2009 and in March 2010. Search terms used in different combinations were: family, family caregiver, next of kin, relatives, palliative, palliative care, end-of-life care, existential, spirit*. Data were redrawn from the papers results/findings, and synthesized into a new descriptive content.

    RESULTS: The results were categorized from 13 papers exploring relatives' important existential concerns and 4 papers describing interventions aimed to support them in the existential area. A majority of the reviewed papers had been written in Sweden and concerned relatives of patients with cancer. One overarching theme, living in the presence of death, and three categories: responses to life close to death; support when death is near; and beyond the presence of death were created.

    CONCLUSION: There is an urgent demand for large-scale studies using accurate methodology, as well as a need to design qualified investigations regarding the effects of various interventions, and to determine which interventions are the most effective in supporting relatives who experience existential distress manifested physically and/or psychologically. There is also a considerable demand for educational interventions among professionals in various healthcare settings to increase their knowledge regarding existential concerns among relatives.

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