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  • 1.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Johansson, Pauline
    Arestedt, Kristofer Franzén
    Berg, Agneta
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Families' Importance in Nursing Care: Nurses' Attitudes--an instrument development2008In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 97-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the development and testing of a research instrument, Families' Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA), designed to measure nurses' attitudes about the importance of involving families in nursing care. The instrument was inductively developed from a literature review and tested with a sample of Swedish nurses. An item-total correlation and a first principal component analysis were used to validate the final instrument, including a second principal component analysis to analyze dimensionality, and Cronbach's alpha was used to estimate internal consistency. The instrument consists of 26 items and reveals four factors: families as a resource in nursing care, family as a conversational partner, family as a burden, and family as its own resource. Cronbach's alpha was 0.88 for the total instrument and 0.69 to 0.80 for the subscales. The instrument requires further testing with other nurse populations.

  • 2.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Johansson, Pauline
    Arestedt, Kristofer Franzén
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Nurses' attitudes about the importance of families in nursing care: a survey of Swedish nurses2008In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 162-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of registered nurses (RNs) about the importance of involving families in nursing care. A sample of 634 randomly selected Swedish RNs completed the instrument, Families' Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA), and reported holding supportive attitudes about families. High scores were found for the subscales: family as a resource in nursing care, family as a conversational partner, family as a burden, and family as its own resource. Variables that predicted a less supportive attitude about involving families in nursing care included being a newly graduated nurse, having no general approach to the care of families at the place of work, and being a male nurse.

  • 3.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    2nd Nordic Family Nursing Conference in Kalmar, Sweden: A brief report.2006In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 344-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eklund, Rakel
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Kreicbergs, Ulrika
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Lövgren, Malin
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Children’s Self-Reports About Illness-Related Information and Family Communication When a Parent Has a Life-Threatening Illness2020In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's experiences of information and family communication when a parent has a life-threatening illness have been sparsely studied, though such information is important for the child's wellbeing. The aim of this study was to explore children's reports of illness-related information and family communication when living with a parent with a life-threatening illness. Forty-eight children, aged 7 to 19 years, were recruited from four specialized palliative home care units in Stockholm, Sweden. All but one child reported that someone had told them about the parent's life-threatening illness; however, two thirds wanted more information. A quarter of the teenagers reported that they had questions about the illness that they did not dare to ask. Half of the children, aged 8 to 12, reported that they felt partially or completely unable to talk about how they felt or show their feelings to someone in the family. Interventions are needed that promote greater family communication and family-professional communication.

  • 5. James, Inger
    et al.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    A family's beliefs about cancer, dying, and death in the end of life.2007In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 226-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this case study was to describe the beliefs over time of a Swedish family and individual family members about cancer and death and how these beliefs affected their daily lives. Data were collected over 10 months using interviews, conversations, and diary notations. The beliefs were aggregated into eight main beliefs and four themes: Cancer is a deadly threat/death is a liberator, death can be held at bay/death can be lived near, dying is done alone/dying should not be done alone, and life has an end/life is endless. These beliefs appear to oscillate between seemingly contrasting poles. Some beliefs were shared by all family members, whereas others were described by only one or more members of the family. The complexity of daily life in families experiencing life-shortening illness underscores the need of individualized nursing care with openness to difference and collaboration as guiding principles.

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