Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Development of a theoretical framework of understanding about relatives´ involvement in palliative care.2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 554-562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Andersson, Åsa
    et al.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Elderly peoples' experience of nursing care after a stroke: from a gender perspective.2009In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 65, no 10, p. 2038-2045-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    andersson å. & hansebo g. (2009) Elderly peoples' experience of nursing care after a stroke: from a gender perspective. Journal of Advanced NursingAbstract Title. Elderly peoples' experience of nursing care after a stroke: from a gender perspective. Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore, from a gender perspective, older people's experiences of nursing care after a stroke. Background. Little attention has been given to gender differences in nursing care. The majority of people who have a stroke are older. Improving knowledge of the gender perspectives of older men and women regarding nursing care after stroke is crucial. Method. This was a qualitative study based on interviews with five women and five men between 66 and 75 years of age, who had received nursing care at a ward for stroke rehabilitation. The data were collected in 2006. Qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out. Findings. A main theme and five categories, all common to both men and women, were identified. The main theme, to promote recovery of the body, encompassed the categories. There were, however, gender differences in how the nursing care received was experienced. The ways patients experienced nursing care seemed to be linked with their lives as women and men before they had the stroke. Their perceptions are linked with their lives as women and men before they had their stroke. Both men and women will reclaim former abilities but what they perceive to be the goals of nursing care and rehabilitation may differ. Conclusion. Nurses need to increase their awareness and knowledge concerning the similarities and gender differences in the experiences and needs of older people, both men and women.

  • 3. Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Struggling to retain the living space: Patients´ stories about their lives as living alone with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 7, p. 1480-1490Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at the end of life: a phenomenological study2008In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 470-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study to describe the essential structure of the lived experience of living with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during the palliative phase of the disease. BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is one of the most common diseases throughout the world. Shortness of breath, fatigue and cough are the most troublesome symptoms, and living with COPD often imposes limitations on daily living. The disease has a great impact on quality of life and affects the extent to which people can be active in daily life. METHODS: We conducted qualitative interviews of eight people with COPD and collected data over a 2-month period in 2003. Our patients were recruited from two pulmonary disease clinics in West Sweden. We used a phenomenological methodology to analyse the interviews. FINDINGS: Daily life for people with COPD is affected in several different ways. The patients described how their physical limitations forced them to refrain from meaningful activities in everyday life and led to social isolation. Everyday emotions vacillated between viewing life as meaningful and meaningless. A sense of involvement and the belief that life was meaningful gave the individual the energy and the desire to continue living and to envision a future. CONCLUSION: Nursing care should include support and facilitation, so that patients can live rather than exist to the end of their lives. It is important to learn from patients and tailor activities to their social, existential and physical priorities, where appropriate family-centred support may be most effective.

  • 5.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Lived experiences of the time preceding burnout2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 59-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports a study to illuminate the complex interaction between person and their life world during the burnout development period. BACKGROUND: Burnout is a construct describing the psychological state resulting from ineffective strategies for coping with enduring stress in both client and non-client work. Role conflict and role ambiguity, or long-term stress and frustration caused by strain in daily life, promote or exacerbate burnout, indicating that the person's entire life world is involved. There is still a lack of description of lived experiences of the time preceding manifest burnout. METHOD: Data were collected from interviews with eight people suffering from burnout and analysed using a phenomenological method. FINDINGS: The essential meaning of the phenomenon of burnout is understood as being trapped with stimulating challenges as a self-nourishing drive on one side and with responsibilities and demands on the other. This essence can be illuminated by its eight constituents: inner incentive, feeling responsible, threatened self-image, cutting off, bodily manifestations, psychological manifestations, fatigue and reaching the bottom line. CONCLUSIONS: The lived experiences of the time preceding manifest burnout are an ambiguous struggle. Cutting off is understood as a mean to shelter the threatened self-image in a state of vulnerability and weakened strength. Accordingly, a better understanding of how to reach behind the defence of 'cutting off' and thus help to open up for consolation and self-acceptance is an essential skill for nurses, health care professionals and others encountering the burnout sufferers. Furthermore this study illuminates early signs of burnout and an important issue is how to strengthen the individuals' ability to shelter their need for recovery and restitution.

  • 6.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Alvariza, Anette
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Capio Palliativ vård Dalen, Stockholm.
    Winnberg, Elisabeth
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Högskolan Dalarna, Uppsala universitet.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Norge.
    Goliath, Ida
    Karolinska institutet, Ersta sjukhus.
    Momeni, Pardis
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Skott, Maria
    Karolinska institutet, Norra Stockholms psykiatri Stockholms läns landsting.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnéuniversitetet, Linköpings universitet, Länssjukhuset i Kalmar.
    Adaptation and evaluation of the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care.2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To adapt the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care and to evaluate its validity and reliability.

    BACKGROUND: Involvement in the professional care has proven to be important for family members. However, they have described feelings of alienation in relation to how they experienced the professionals' approach. To explore this issue, a broad instrument that can be used in different care contexts is needed.

    DESIGN: A psychometric evaluation study, with a cross-sectional design.

    METHOD: The content validity of the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire was evaluated during 2014 by cognitive interviews with 15 family members to adults in different care contexts. Psychometric evaluation was then conducted (2015-2016). A sample of 325 family members participated, 103 of whom in a test-retest evaluation. Both parametric and non-parametric methods were used.

    RESULTS: The content validity revealed that the questionnaire was generally understood and considered to be relevant and retrievable by family members in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. Furthermore, the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (Revised), demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of data quality, homogeneity, unidimensionality (factor structure), internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

    CONCLUSION: The study provides evidence that the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (Revised) is reliable and valid for use in further research and in quality assessment in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Registered Nurses' work experiences: personal accounts integrated with professional identity 2004In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 284-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The work context is important for the development of Registered Nurses' skills and identity as professionals, but the work context and organization can also hinder their professional development.

    Aim. This paper reports a study whose purpose was to understand the meaning of Registered Nurses' narratives of their work experience 5 years after graduation.

    Research method. Data were collected in 2001 from interviews with 16 Registered Nurses 5 years after graduation and analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method, influenced by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur.

    Results. Analyses of the narratives resulted in three themes: 'The meaning of caring and protection of patients', 'The meaning of work organization in nurses' work' and 'The implied meaning of using one's individual attributes in one's professional role'. Since the number of nurses participating in the study is small, it is important to re-contextualize the results when transferring them to other contexts.

    Conclusions. There is a complex interrelationship between the health care organization, individual attributes of nurses (including self-esteem) and patient care. Provision of adequate resources and support for nurses' professional and personal development is needed to ensure high quality patient care, and these are political issues.

  • 8.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kihlgren, Mona
    Experiencing a nurse identity: the meaning of identity to Swedish registered nurses 2 years after graduation2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The professional identity and experiences of nurses have been focused upon in different studies AIM: This is a longitudinal study whose aim was to understand how nurses experience the meaning of their identity as nurses, when they are students and nurses 2 years after graduation. DESIGN: Data were collected through interviews once a year during education and two years after graduation, and were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method, inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. FINDINGS: The analyses of the narratives resulted in four perspectives: 'Having the patient in focus', 'Being a team leader', 'Preceptorship' and 'Task orientation'. The nurses did not change perspectives but the perspective showed a transition over time.

  • 9. Frid, I
    et al.
    Haljamäe, H
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Bergbom, I
    Brain death: close relatives' use of imagery as a descriptor of experience2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Glasberg, A L
    et al.
    Eriksson, S
    Norberg, A
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Burnout and 'stress of conscience' among healthcare personnel.2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 392-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study examining factors that may contribute to burnout among healthcare personnel. BACKGROUND: The impact on burnout of factors such as workload and interpersonal conflicts is well-documented. However, although health care is a moral endeavour, little is known about the impact of moral strain. Interviews reveal that healthcare personnel experience a troubled conscience when they feel that they cannot provide the good care that they wish - and believe it is their duty - to give. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, conducted in 2003, a sample of 423 healthcare personnel in Sweden completed a battery of questionnaires comprising the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Perception of Conscience Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Social Interactions Scale, Resilience Scale and a personal/work demographic form. RESULTS: Regression analysis resulted in a model that explained approximately 59% of the total variation in emotional exhaustion. Factors associated with emotional exhaustion were 'having to deaden one's conscience', and 'stress of conscience' from lacking the time to provide the care needed, work being so demanding that it influences one's home life, and not being able to live up to others' expectations. Several additional variables were associated with emotional exhaustion. Factors contributing to depersonalization were 'having to deaden one's conscience', 'stress of conscience' from not being able to live up to others' expectations and from having to lower one's aspirations to provide good care, deficient social support from co-workers, and being a physician; however, the percentage of variation explained was smaller (30%). CONCLUSION: Being attentive to our own and others' feelings of troubled conscience is important in preventing burnout in health care, and staff need opportunities to reflect on their troubled conscience. Further research is needed into how a troubled conscience can be eased, particularly focusing on the working environment.

  • 11. Glasberg, Ann-Louise
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Söderberg, Anna
    Sources of burnout among healthcare employees as perceived by managers.2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 10-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study to investigate healthcare managers' perspectives on factors contributing to the increase of healthcare employees on sick leave for burnout symptoms. BACKGROUND: Current turbulent healthcare reorganization has resulted in structural instability, role conflicts and vague responsibility commitments, all of which contribute to increasing numbers of sick days caused by burnout symptoms. Managers' perceptions of burnout sources are important as these perceptions guide the actions taken to prevent burnout. METHOD: Interviews were carried out with 30 healthcare managers, with different occupational backgrounds and from different units. The data were collected in Sweden in 2003 and analysed using thematic qualitative content analysis. FINDINGS: According to the healthcare managers, continuous reorganization and downsizing of healthcare services has reduced resources and increased demands and responsibilities. These problems are compounded by high ideals and expectations, making staff question their own abilities and worth as well as making them feel less confirmed and less valued as people. The main finding indicates that healthcare employees are thrown into a spiralling sense of inadequacy and an emerging sense of pessimism and powerlessness. CONCLUSION: To understand and influence people's actions, one has to understand their perceptions and thoughts - their explanatory models. This study shows the complexity and interconnection between sources of burnout as perceived by healthcare managers, and highlights the encouragement of realism without the destruction of enthusiasm as an important factor in management and healthcare practice.

  • 12.
    Hagren, Birger
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Pettersen, Inga-Märta
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    Lützén, Kim
    Clyne, Naomi
    The haemodialysis machine as a lifeline: experiences of suffering from end-stage renal disease2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 196-202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hansebo, Görel
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kihlgren, M
    Ljunggren, G
    Review of nursing documentation in nursing home wards - changes after intervention for individualized care.1999In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1462-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using standardized assessment instruments may help staff identify needs, problems and resources which could be a basis for nursing care, and facilitate and improve the quality of documentation. The Resident Assessment Instrument/Minimum Data Set (RAI/MDS) especially developed for the care of elderly people, was used as a basis for individualized and documented nursing care. This study was carried out to compare nursing documentation in three nursing home wards in Sweden, before and after a one-year period of supervised intervention. The review of documentation focused on structure and content in both nursing care plans and daily notes. The greatest change seen after intervention was the writing of care plans for the individual patients. Daily notes increased both in total and within parts of the nursing process used, but reflected mostly temporary situations. Even though the documentation of nursing care increased the most, it was the theme medical treatment which was the most extensive overall. A difference was seen between computer-triggered Resident Assessment Protocol (RAP) items, obtained from the RAI/MDS assessments, and items in the nursing care plans; the former could be regarded as a means of quality assurance and of making staff aware of the need for further discussions. The RAI/MDS instrument seems to be a useful tool for the dynamic process in nursing care delivered and as a basis for documentation. The documentation should communicate a patient's situation and progress, and if staff are to be able to use it in their everyday nursing care activity, it must be well-structured and freely available. The importance of continuing education and supervision in nursing documentation for development of a reliable source of information was confirmed by the present study.

  • 14.
    Hansebo, Görel
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kihlgren, M
    Ljunggren, G
    Winblad, B
    Staff views on the Resident Assessment Instrument, RAI/MDS, in nursing homes, and the use of the Cognitive Performance Scale, CPS, in different levels of care in Stockholm, Sweden.1998In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 642-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multidimensional functional assessment is the basis of individualized care. It is especially important in the care of elderly, with the complexity of symptomatology and often with cognitive impairment present. An assessment instrument for elderly persons, used in this study, is the Resident Assessment Instrument/Minimum Data Set (RAI/MDS) and its incorporated MDS Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS). The purposes of the study were to demonstrate the cognitive performance in elderly persons in different levels of care by using the CPS and to elicit the views of staff on use of the RAI/MDS. Cognitive impairment was found in 1276 elderly persons in six levels of care studied, an important factor to consider when organizing care of elderly. An intervention study was carried out for 1 year in three nursing home wards, with training and supervision in implementation of the RAI/MDS including individualized and documented care. Part of a questionnaire was used to evaluate staff (n = 50) views on using the instrument. A majority of the staff thought that the RAI/MDS could contribute to the improvement of quality of care, documentation in nursing records, and in co-operation and engagement. Further research is necessary to elicit more knowledge on the usefulness and benefits of the instrument.

  • 15.
    Hansebo, Görel
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Kihlgren, Mona
    Nursing home care: changes after supervision.2004In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 269-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An intervention project was conducted in three nursing home wards in Sweden. Most patients had severe dementia. The intervention consisted of supervision for individualized and documented nursing care, based on multidimensional assessment. AIM: To illuminate changes in carers' approach after the intervention. METHODS: Several data collections were conducted across the intervention and consisted of nursing documentation, patient life stories as told by carers, video recorded interactions, stimulated recall interviews and a questionnaire. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in the analyses. FINDINGS: The findings from the different methods mirrored each other and added to the credibility of the intervention. Communicated knowledge about patients improved in nursing documentation and also as told by carers. Carers were differently skilled in managing the complexity of nursing care situations before as well as after the intervention, but the intervention contributed to developing carers in 'confirming nursing care'. They also improved in their ability to verbalize reflections about their everyday life with patients with dementia. CONCLUSION: Supervision made it possible for carers to share their lived experiences about their day-to-day life with patients, which could promote personal and professional development and thus improve care quality. It also appeared that a detailed assessment tool used as part of the nursing process contributed to seeing a patient as a real person behind a dementia surface.

  • 16.
    Hellzén, Ove
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Umeå universitet.
    Being in a fragmented and isolated world: Iinterviews with carers working with a person with severely autistic disorder2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 346-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To illuminate the meaning of being a carer for a person having a severe autistic disorder. Background: Carers working with people with severe autim are occasionally exposed to residents’ self-injurious behaviours and violent actions and at time residents appear resistant to all forms of treatment. Design/Method: A qualitative case study was conducted. Six Swedish carers (ENs), working at a special ward on a nursing home were interviewed about their lived experiences when caring for an individual having a severe autistic disorder. Narrative interviews were conducted and interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by Paul Ricoeur. Findings: Two themes were formulated which describe the carers’ reality and their dream of an ideal, which described carers’ experiences of being trapped in a segmented and isolated care reality and thier longing to achieve a sense of wholeness. The findings were interpreted and reflected on in the light of a framework inspired by the German philosopher Karl Jaspers in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the text. Concusions: In their desperation the carers used their empirical knowledge based on scientific knowledge, which could be understood as a substitute for their vision of a consolating wholeness. This paper shows that searching for a substitute to consolation seems to be an important aspect of the meaning of being a carer for a person with severe autistic disorder.

  • 17. Jackson, Karin
    et al.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Schollin, Jens
    From alienation to familiarity: experiences of mothers and fathers of preterm infants.2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The birth of a preterm infant has a long-term impact on both parents. Mothers report more stress and poor adjustment compared with fathers. Influencing factors, such as family situation and health status of the child, can support or weaken the coping ability of the parents. Studies on experiences of fathers are sparse.

    AIM: The aim of this research was to study how mothers and fathers of preterm infants describe their experiences of parenthood during the infant's first 18 months of life.

    METHODS: Seven consecutively selected sets of parents of preterm infants born at </=34 weeks of gestation with no serious congenital defects were interviewed 1-2 weeks after the infant's birth and at 2, 6 and 18 months of age, and the findings were analysed using a phenomenological method.

    FINDINGS: Internalization of parenthood was described as a time-dependent process, with four syntheses of experiences - alienation, responsibility, confidence and familiarity. Within the syntheses, similarities in how mothers and fathers described their parental roles involved concern for the child, insecurity, adjustment and relationship with the child. Regarding differences, mothers experienced having more responsibility and control of the care and a need to be confirmed as a mother, while fathers described confidence in leaving the care to the staff and wanted to find a balance between work and family life. Important turning points in parenthood experiences often occurred when the infant could be removed from the incubator, discharged from the ward, and when the infant looked normal compared to full-term infants.

    CONCLUSIONS: The structure of the phenomenon of parenthood was formed by the integration of the syntheses of alienation, responsibility, confidence and familiarity. The structure seems to be based on the parents' expectations of the parental role, the infant's health condition and the health care environment. These interacting factors are influenced by cultural beliefs.

  • 18.
    Juthberg, Christina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Eriksson, Sture
    Umeå universitet.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC. Umeå universitet.
    Sundin, Karin
    Umeå universitet.
    Perceptions of conscience, stress of conscience and burnout among nursing staff in residential elder care2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 1708-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study of patterns of perceptions of conscience, stress of conscience and burnout in relation to occupational belonging among Registered Nurses and nursing assistants in municipal residential care of older people.

    BACKGROUND: Stress and burnout among healthcare personnel and experiences of ethical difficulties are associated with troubled conscience. In elder care the experience of a troubled conscience seems to be connected to occupational role, but little is known about how Registered Nurses and nursing assistants perceive their conscience, stress of conscience and burnout.

    METHOD: Results of previous analyses of data collected in 2003, where 50 Registered Nurses and 96 nursing assistants completed the Perceptions of Conscience Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire and Maslach Burnout Inventory, led to a request for further analysis. In this study Partial Least Square Regression was used to detect statistical predictive patterns.

    RESULT: Perceptions of conscience and stress of conscience explained 41.9% of the variance in occupational belonging. A statistical predictive pattern for Registered Nurses was stress of conscience in relation to falling short of expectations and demands and to perception of conscience as demanding sensitivity. A statistical predictive pattern for nursing assistants was perceptions that conscience is an authority and an asset in their work. Burnout did not contribute to the explained variance in occupational belonging.

    CONCLUSION: Both occupational groups viewed conscience as an asset and not a burden. Registered Nurses seemed to exhibit sensitivity to expectations and demands and nursing assistants used their conscience as a source of guidance in their work. Structured group supervision with personnel from different occupations is needed so that staff can gain better understanding about their own occupational situation as well as the situation of other occupational groups.

  • 19.
    Kneck, Åsa
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Klang, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Learning to live with diabetes: integrating an illness or objectifying a disease2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 11, p. 2486-2495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This paper is a report of a study of illuminating the meaning of ‘learning to live with diabetes’ 3 years after being diagnosed.

    Background: A changed situation, for example, in relation to living with diabetes, raises a need to understand. How time for experience contributes to this learning process for people living with diabetes is not yet well understood. It would therefore seem valuable to ask people, who have had diabetes over a similar length of time, to narrate their experience in relation to daily life situations in order to understand better how learning is established.

    Design: The study has a qualitative design.

    Methods: A life world approach was used, with interviews being conducted with 13 people who had been diagnosed with diabetes 3 years earlier. Data were collected in 2007, and analyses were conducted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method.

    Findings: How a person experiences the physical body was found to be crucial in the learning process. If the body with its signals is understood it can be a tool for experiencing and understanding the world and oneself. Feeling insecure about one’s own needs, and not trusting or understanding bodily signs, made participants dependent on others to make decisions for them.

    Conclusion: This study showed that duration of illness was ‘not’ of importance for the understanding of living with diabetes. Living with diabetes 3 years after being diagnosed meant to experience both an overall balance in one’s existence and a daily struggle.

  • 20. Lindahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Söderberg, Anna
    The meaning of caring for people with malodorous exuding ulcers2008In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 163-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study to illuminate the meaning of caring for people with malodorous exuding ulcers. Background. Managing ulcers is complicated and consensus on assessment and treatment difficult to reach. Nurses need knowledge and skills to provide good care. They must stay close and be exposed to contamination and suffering. They must provide care without violating patients and we need to further explore this challenge. Method. A convenience sample of ten participants was recruited. Participants had experience of caring for people with malodorous exuding ulcers and were employed in primary health or hospital care in Sweden. Narrative interviews were conducted during late 2002 to early 2005 and interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method. Findings. Themes were formulated: ‘Facing the wound’ when nurses reveal what is meant to be concealed and perceive patients’ vulnerability; ‘Facing one’s own defencelessness’ when feeling invaded, helpless and ashamed; ‘Struggling to shield one’s own defencelessness’ was achieved by striving to be in control, striving to endure and seeking a way out. ‘Struggling to shield patients’ vulnerability’ was about alleviating patients’ additional suffering by striving to spare patients, pushing boundaries, making uncomfortable decisions and sharing togetherness. When failing to shield their own defencelessness and patients’ vulnerability, nurses run the risk of experiencing desolation. Conclusion. Physical proximity and bodily suffering affect nurses. Caring for people with ulcers calls for improved interprofessional cooperation in order to provide the best treatments and care. Further education for these nurses is needed, as well as support from managements and organizations.

  • 21. Löfmark, A
    et al.
    Hannersjö, S
    Wikblad, K
    A summative evaluation of clinical competence: students' and nurses' perceptions of inpatients' individual physical and emotional needs.1999In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 942-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to assess individual patients' physical and emotional needs was used as one foundation for evaluation of clinical competence for Swedish student nurses. Each of the randomly sampled 48 student nurses and their corresponding supervisors (48 nurses) assessed the perceived needs of a patient they both knew well by separately answering a questionnaire concerning basic physical and emotional needs. Simultaneously the selected patients (n = 48) were interviewed about their perceived needs. Student nurses' and nurses' assessments were compared with the individual patient's opinion. Both the students' and the nurses' assessments showed close similarities with the patients' own estimations, although certain under- and overestimations for both physical and emotional needs were found, with a predominance of overestimation of emotional needs. Student nurses and nurses also showed uncertainty in some of their assessments, mainly concerning emotional needs. Their assessments were closer than student nurses/patients or nurses/patients, and also closer for physical than for emotional needs. The conformity in student nurses' and their supervisors' assessments might be understood as the supervisors' influence as role models. Attention should be paid both in nursing education and in clinical practice to the need for individualization of patient care.

  • 22. Löfmark, A
    et al.
    Wikblad, K
    Facilitating and obstructing factors for development of learning in clinical practice: a student perspective.2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 43-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of this study was to provide information on what the student nurses found facilitating and obstructing for their learning during clinical practice. BACKGROUND: Earlier studies of experiences of learning in clinical practice have shown that factors as the possibilities of variations of experiences, the culture of the workplace, and communication between the educational institution and health care facilities are of importance. Less is known about the opportunities which students are given in order to practise the skills that they will be expected to perform as new graduate nurses. METHODS: The experiences of 47 degree student nurses from two colleges in Sweden were gathered in weekly diaries during their final period of clinical practice. A content analysis technique was used to analyse their diaries. RESULTS: The students emphasized responsibility and independence, opportunities to practise different tasks, and receiving feedback as facilitating factors. Other perceived promoting factors included perceptions of control of the situation and understanding of the 'total picture'. Examples of obstructing factors were the nurses as supervisors not relying on the students, supervision that lacked continuity and lack of opportunities to practise. Perception of their own insufficiency and low self-reliance were drawbacks for some students. CONCLUSIONS: Recommended proposals are presented to lecturers and supervising staff concerning organizational and educational changes, and changes of attitudes for elucidating the students' experiences of different facilitating and obstructing factors. Changes may contribute to making easier the students' transition into the nursing profession.

  • 23. Löfmark, Anna
    et al.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Wikblad, Karin
    Competence of newly-graduated nurses--a comparison of the perceptions of qualified nurses and students.2006In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 721-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study that compares opinions of final year nursing students, rating their own competence, with the opinions of experienced nurses on the competence of newly-graduated nurses. BACKGROUND: The transition of nursing preparation into higher education is regarded as positive, although it has led to differences in opinion about the competence of newly-graduated nurses and their readiness to enter the nursing profession. There are studies showing that newly-graduated nurses perceive themselves as holistically focused, professional practitioners, while other nurses are concerned that newly-graduated nurses do not have necessary skills. METHODS: A convenience sample of 106 nursing students in the final week of their course and 136 nurses who had experience of supervising nursing students completed a questionnaire. The data were collected in 2002. RESULTS: Own competence, in the form of ability to perform nursing care, was rated by nursing students to be good or strongly developed in most of the investigated areas of nursing care. Experienced nurses also estimated newly-graduated nurses' competence to be good or strongly developed, although to a lesser extent. Nurses qualified within the previous 5 years rated newly-graduated nurses' competence to be higher in comparison with those with less recent education. CONCLUSIONS: Further studies are needed to broaden our understanding of why some areas of nursing care, such as ethical awareness, were rated very highly, while others, like informing and teaching of co-workers and planning and prioritizing interventions had the lowest rating.

  • 24. Löfmark, Anna
    et al.
    Thorell-Ekstrand, Ingrid
    An assessment form for clinical nursing education: a Delphi study.2004In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 291-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper reports a study to develop further the existing assessment form and to capture new aspects of assessment for the nursing profession of the future for inclusion in the form. BACKGROUND: Since nursing education became part of the higher education system, the assessment of clinical periods of the programme has become more complicated and requirements are more demanding. Changes in the health care sector, such as demographic changes and shorter hospitalization, create demands upon the independent nursing role of the future. Many educational documents, such as an assessment form, must continuously be up-dated and adapted to changes in society. METHOD: A Delphi study concerning the content of this assessment form was carried out using two rounds. Through this process, an expert panel gave their opinions about the form and possible changes to it. RESULTS: There was general acceptance of the content in the current assessment form. Suggested changes were the addition of two factors concerning collaboration with the family and society, and development of the student's independence. Two new area headings were suggested: one about ability to use the nursing process, and the other about development of a professional stance. CONCLUSIONS: The suggested changes in the assessment form match expected changes in the health care sector and the demands of an academic nursing education.

  • 25.
    Magnusson, Annabella
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Severinsson, Elisabeth
    Lützén, Kim
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Reconstructing mental health nursing in home care2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 351-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric care for people in Sweden with long-term mental health problems has shifted from institutional to community and home settings. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore and describe mental health nurses' experiences of how structural changes in mental health nursing influence interaction when providing home care to patients with long-term mental health problems. METHOD: We conducted interviews with 11 mental health nurses who provided home care to people with long-term mental health problems. The constant comparative method of grounded theory was used for data collection and analysis. FINDINGS: The process of attempting to reconstruct mental health nursing by entering into the everyday reality of people with long-term mental health problems was identified as the core category. Central to this process was a change in perspective from nurse-controlled to client-centred care. This led to changes in moral values, assessment of client needs, and ways of meeting clients and establishing relationships. However, attempts to reconstruct mental health nursing according to a client-centred perspective became problematic when clients were at risk of harming themselves. In these situations, respondents felt the need to make decisions for clients, and this was experienced as burdensome and lonely. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the process of reconstructing mental health nursing in line with a client-centred perspective is incomplete. Opportunities to interact with people with mental health problems in the home environment may lead to a broader perspective on the daily lives of these people, but also to a realization that home care cannot be modelled on institutional care.

  • 26.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Lindberg, Maria
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Larsson, Rigmor
    Landstinget Gävleborg.
    Fläckman, Birgitta
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Engström, Maria
    Högskolan i Gävle; Uppsala universitet.
    Deficient knowledge of multidrug-resistant bacteria and preventive hygiene measures among primary healthcare personnel2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 4, p. 756-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper is a report of a study conducted to describe primary healthcare personnel's knowledge of multidrug-resistant and preventive hygiene measures.

    BACKGROUND: The group of patients at risk for multi-drug resistant bacteria is largely cared for in primary care. Knowledge of multidrug-resistant and hygiene preventive measures among primary healthcare personnel is therefore essential.

    METHOD: A descriptive and comparative questionnaire survey among primary healthcare personnel was performed in 2008. In total, five urban and rural primary healthcare centres situated in one county in central Sweden were included. Convenient sampling was used and 10 physicians, 38 district nurses and 10 nursing assistants participated. Knowledge/medical facts concerning multidrug-resistant and hygiene preventive measures were investigated and data were analysed using a quantitative approach.

    RESULTS: Knowledge/medical facts concerning several aspects of multidrug-resistant bacteria, particularly Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase producing bacteria, were deficient as was knowledge of different aspects of hygiene preventive measures. Physicians showed significantly better results than district nurses and nursing assistants did. Awareness of proper hand-washing as an effective preventive method and use of aprons in nursing care was high among all participants. Staff who knew they had cared for these patients had significantly better results than the others did.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that evidence-based education of multidrug-resistant and hygiene preventive measures, in primary health with subsequent follow-ups should become a prioritized clinician and management concern. Research is needed that focus implementation of evidence-based educations, staff attitudes and responsibilities related to the work with patients at risk of multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  • 27.
    Normann, Hans Ketil
    et al.
    University of Tromsø, Norway.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå universitet.
    Episodes of lucidity in people with severe dementia as narrated by formal carers1998In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1295-1300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty formal carers employed in three nursing homes narrated 92 episodes of lucidity (ELs) in people with severe dementia. Sixty-two episodes concerned speech, nine concerned actions and 21 episodes concerned both speech and actions. Most ELs were said to occur spontaneously when the patients were acting closely together with a carer who did not make demands on them and regarded them as valuable human beings whose behaviour was a meaningful expression of their experiences. The narrations showed characteristics that indicated trustworthiness and the episodes described in three separate nursing homes were very similar and resembled descriptions given in previous research reports as well as in relatives' reports. Further research seems necessary and the assumption that severe dementia implies the destruction of the self or personhood must be questioned.

  • 28.
    Normann, Hans Ketil
    et al.
    University of Tromsø, Norway & Umeå universitet.
    Norberg, Astrid
    University of Tromsø, Norway & Umeå universitet.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    University of Tromsø, Norway & Umeå universitet.
    Confirmation and lucidity during conversations with a woman with severe dementia2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 370-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale. Patients with severe dementia sometimes surprise the care providers because they seem to be much more aware of their situation and function much more adequately than usual. Such episodes are labelled 'episodes of lucidity' (ELs). The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of the particular conversations with a woman with severe dementia when ELs occurred as compared with conversations when she was not lucid.

    Methodological design. A woman with a probable diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was selected. Her Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was estimated as 3. The first author met the woman for 4 hours five times over a period of 2 weeks.

    Research methods. The conversations were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The text was divided into 278 content units and analysed.

    Findings. Lucidity is promoted by supporting the patient in various ways, that is sharing the patient's view, repeating and reformulating the patient's utterance, reinforcing the patient by using positive utterances, not emphasizing errors and supporting the patient's language in various ways, and avoiding making demands. The relation between the patient and her conversation partner during ELs is characterized by confirmation and communion.

    Conclusions. This case study indicates that a supportive attitude in conversation with the patient with severe dementia promotes lucidity. A supportive attitude includes the avoidance on the part of the conversational partner making demands on the patient, confirming the patient as an important, unique and valuable person and creating communion. The connection between supporting and avoiding demands and lucidity/nonlucidity during conversation needs further study.

  • 29. Råholm, Maj-Britt
    et al.
    Hedegaard, Birte Larsen
    Löfmark, Anna
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Slettebø, Ashild
    Nursing education in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden - from Bachelor's degree to PhD.2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 2126-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This paper is a discussion of the similarities and differences in baccalaureate nursing education programme structures, content and pathways to postbaccalaureate education in the Scandinavian countries.

    BACKGROUND: For the last three decades nursing education internationally, as well as in the Scandinavian countries, has experienced ongoing reforms. The driving forces behind these reforms have been efforts for professional development within nursing and to harmonize higher education in several European countries.

    DATA SOURCES: The data were collected by a critical review of the guiding principles, national directives and educational structures and content of Bachelor's degree programmes from 1990 to 2008 and of further educational levels in the four Scandinavian countries.

    DISCUSSION: There are similarities as well as substantial differences in the educational structures, contents and lengths in the different nursing programmes. Nursing education is organized in the three cycles described in the Bologna Process, but there are differences regarding names and terms for degrees and allocation of European Credit Transfer System credits.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Policymakers need to consider more carefully the directives in the Bologna Declaration when planning and implementing nursing programmes at Bachelor's and postgraduate levels. Knowledge of the content and structure of nursing education in these countries may enhance development and cooperation between institutions.

    CONCLUSION: A challenge for the ministries of education in the Scandinavian countries is to compare and coordinate nursing educational programmes in order to enable nursing students, educators, researchers and nurses to study and work in Scandinavia, Europe or even globally.

  • 30. Tishelman, Carol
    et al.
    Bernhardson, Britt-Marie
    Blomberg, Karin
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    Franklin, Liselotte
    Johansson, Eva
    Leveälahti, Helena
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Complexity in caring for patients with advanced cancer2004In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 420-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The gap between nursing research and practice is readily acknowledged in literature, with a variety of strategies suggested for reducing this gap. It is necessary not only to address problems of research implementation in practice, but also to find strategies that strengthen the influence of practitioners on research agendas through more collaborative relationships in order to have an impact on care of patients. A multi-centre research project was therefore initiated by two universities and three health care facilities, aiming to improve quality of care for patients with advanced cancer through a knowledge-exchange programme between nurse researchers, practitioners and students.

    AIM: The aim of this article is to explore how clinical staff reason about care provision for patients with advanced cancer, through analysis of 20 focus group discussions conducted with staff in three different health care facilities in two Swedish cities. An initial analysis based on grounded theory was complemented with consideration of the interactive process in the focus group discussions, and carried out by a team consisting of senior nurse researchers, clinical experts and nursing instructors.

    FINDINGS: The findings of the focus group discussions emphasize the complexity of caregiving for patients with advanced cancer. The tension between caregiving ideals and limits imposed by the realities of caregiving in today's health system were striking. Practitioners discussed the organization of care, different constellations of relationships between patients, family members and professionals, and theoretical and experiential knowledge as equally important aspects in dealing with all concrete situations in daily practice. The importance of reflective practice, use of self and ethical reasoning also permeated the focus group discussions.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight an integrated need both to influence organizational structures and working relationships, along with increasing knowledge, if sustainable change is to be effected.

  • 31.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Segesten, K
    Professional identity of the nurse: concept analysis and development1998In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 720-7Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf