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  • 1.
    Bos (Sparén), Elisabeth
    et al.
    Center for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan
    Karolinska institutet.
    Saarikoski, Mikko
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Kaila, Päivi
    Karolinska institutet.
    Factors associated with student learning processes in primary health care units: a questionnaire study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 170-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical placement plays a key role in education intended to develop nursing and caregiving skills. Studies of nursing students' clinical learning experiences show that these dimensions affect learning processes: (i) supervisory relationship, (ii) pedagogical atmosphere, (iii) management leadership style, (iv) premises of nursing care on the ward, and (v) nursing teachers' roles. Few empirical studies address the probability of an association between these dimensions and factors such as student (a) motivation, (b) satisfaction with clinical placement, and (c) experiences with professional role models.

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to investigate factors associated with the five dimensions in clinical learning environments within primary health care units.

    DESIGN AND METHODS: The Swedish version of Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Teacher, a validated evaluation scale, was administered to 356 graduating nursing students after four or five weeks clinical placement in primary health care units. Response rate was 84%. Multivariate analysis of variance is determined if the five dimensions are associated with factors a, b, and c above.

    RESULTS: The analysis revealed a statistically significant association with the five dimensions and two factors: students' motivation and experiences with professional role models. The satisfaction factor had a statistically significant association (effect size was high) with all dimensions; this clearly indicates that students experienced satisfaction.

    CONCLUSIONS: These questionnaire results show that a good clinical learning experience constitutes a complex whole (totality) that involves several interacting factors. Supervisory relationship and pedagogical atmosphere particularly influenced students' satisfaction and motivation. These results provide valuable decision-support material for clinical education planning, implementation, and management.

  • 2. Dahlqvist, Vera
    et al.
    Söderberg, Anna
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Dealing with stress: patterns of self-comfort among healthcare students.2008In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 476-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress among healthcare students is a growing problem. As self-comfort is assumed to be a way of coping with stressful emotions, the aim of this study was to describe the patterns of self-comforting actions that healthcare students usually use in distress. One hundred and sixty-eight healthcare students volunteered to write down accounts of what they do when they comfort themselves. Their accounts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings reveal two themes: Ingressing and Transcending. Ingressing comprises the sub-themes Unloading, Distracting, Nurturing oneself, Withdrawing and Reassuring. Transcending comprises the sub-themes Opening up and Finding new perspectives. These findings are in line with some stress-reducing strategies described in the literature on stress management. Winnicott's theory about the phenomenon of transition is used to interpret the findings. In the light of Winnicott's theory, self-comforting measures can be comprehended as the ability to transfer early childhood experiences of being nurtured and comforted into well-adapted strategies to effect relaxation and gain strength.

  • 3.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Ericsson, K
    Two studies of the new nursing education in Sweden: I. The place of gerontology and geriatrics. 2. Student characteristics and expectations.1997In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 150-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the autumn of 1993, a new system of nursing education started in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to the presidents of all the colleges of nursing, health and the caring sciences, and questions were asked about the part played by gerontology and geriatrics in the new curricula. The responses showed a considerable variety in the amounts of theoretical and clinical education given at the colleges. During the first or second week of their education, the students admitted to three colleges in the Mälaren area answered a questionnaire containing questions about their educational backgrounds, their working experiences in the health care system, why they chose nursing education, their ideas of the tasks that a registered nurse primarily carries out, and their preferences for work after graduation. The result shows a correlation between working experience and the reasons for studies. The students stated a preference for working in emergency care rather than in geriatric care after graduation from college.

  • 4.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    “Learning by doing”: Or how to reach an understanding of the research method phenomenological hermeneutics2009In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 735-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One problem addressed in teaching graduate students qualitative research methods is practising the cognitive and conative skills that students need to generate both rich data and meaningful analysis.

    The aim of the study was to illuminate development in a group of pre-doctoral and doctoral students as they learnt the phenomenological hermeneutics research method.

    In a course comprising 18 doctoral students we used the “guided path” pedagogical approach and decided to use a subject of which everyone has lived experience, “troubled conscience”, for the phenomenological hermeneutic analysis conducted with the students. As the students progressed in their learning experience of the research method, they analysed their data according to the steps in the method, and we as teachers conducted separate analyses of the same data.

    The results point in the same direction as previous studies in the field. This is discussed in terms of strength of the pedagogical approach and the students’ learning, since despite the fact that their data are limited and not very detailed they were able to come up with results that were in line with previous research.

  • 5. Geman Millberg, L
    et al.
    Berg, L
    Lindström, I
    Petzäll, K
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Tensions related to implementation of postgraduate degree projects in specialist nursing education2011In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 283-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Pennbrant, S
    et al.
    University West, Dept. of Nursing, Health & Culture.
    Nilsson, MS
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC. Göteborgs universitet.
    Rudman, A
    Mastering the professional role as a newly graduated registered nurse2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 739-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Saveman, Britt-Inger
    et al.
    Måhlén, Christina D
    Benzein, Eva G
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Nursing students' beliefs about families in nursing care.2005In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 480-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring for families is a growing part of nurses' professional work in various health care settings and consequently an important issue for nursing education. One way to determine the readiness for nursing students to meet families is to reveal their beliefs about families. Beliefs can be uncovered through interpretation of conversations, as beliefs are embedded in our stories. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students' beliefs about families in nursing care. Nine nursing students, three from each year of a three-year programme, were interviewed individually. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. First, a manifest content analysis was performed followed by a latent content analysis in order to reveal underpinning beliefs. The results demonstrate beliefs about families and nurses and their relationship, for example, if family members are close to each other and when the patient is cared for in his/her own home, it reduces suffering for the whole family, and if nurses create a trusting relationship and atmosphere, it fosters the families' well-being. Although the beliefs uncovered are seen as facilitative ones, educational efforts are essential to implement family nursing both theoretically and practically in curricula throughout the nursing education.

  • 8.
    Westerbotn, Margareta
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet högskola.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Hovland, Olav Johannes
    Norge.
    Elrond, Malene
    Danmark.
    Pedersen, Ingrid
    Danmark.
    Lejonqvist, Gun-Britt
    Finland.
    Dulavik, Johild
    Island.
    Ecklon, Tove
    Danmark.
    Nilsson, Inga-Lill
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Sigurdardottir, Árún K
    Island.
    Taking part in Nordic collaboration; nursing students' experiences and perceptions from a learning perspective: A qualitative study.2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 712-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nordic networking of different kinds has a long tradition aiming to increase collaboration and understanding between citizens in different countries. Cultural competence in relation to health care and nursing is important for clinical nurses and is a central issue in nurse education.

    OBJECTIVE: To gain an understanding of what nurse students experienced and learned during an intensive course in diabetes together with students and nurse educators from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Faroe Islands.

    METHODS: In 2012, an intensive course within the Nordic network, Nordkvist, was conducted in Faroe Islands with the theme "Nursing - to live a good life with diabetes". To answer the objective of the study, 26 students conducted written reflections based on two questions. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Through meetings with nurse students and educators from the Nordic countries the intensive course strengthened the students' identification with the nursing profession. The students gained new perspectives on diabetes, such as how complex it can be to live with a chronic illness. Because of the difficulties in understanding one another and because of different mother tongues, the students gained a better understanding of patients' vulnerability in relation to hospital jargon and how it felt to be in an unfamiliar place.

    CONCLUSIONS: The intensive course increased the students' personal and professional growth, cross-cultural competence, and their identification with nursing. Students' understanding of health care in the Nordic countries improved as similarities and differences were recognized.

  • 9.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Furåker, C
    Jakobsson, E
    Bergh, I
    Hermansson, E
    Impact of the Bologna process in Bachelor nursing programmes: The Swedish case2011In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 122-8Article in journal (Refereed)
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