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  • 1.
    Audulv, Åsa
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf
    Mittuniversitetet.
    The integration of chronic illness self-management2012In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 332-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-management is crucial for people living with chronic diseases, but the actual process of integrating self-management has not been explored in depth. In this article, we investigate the integration of self-management into the lives of people with chronic illness. In this longitudinal study, we used an interpretive description approach. Twenty-one individuals were interviewed regularly during the first 3 years after they were diagnosed with a chronic condition. We found self-management integration to be an ongoing process that included four phases: seeking effective self-management strategies, considering costs and benefits, creating routines and plans of action, and negotiating self-management that fits one's life. The participants managed the phases according to their context, e.g., illness experience, life situation, personal beliefs, and social support. Health care providers should therefore facilitate self-management integration by providing support that is adjusted to the person's phase of self-management integration and life context.

  • 2.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Hälsoakademin, Örebro universitet.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, .
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Being me and being us in a family living close to death at home2011In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 683-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used interpretive description to describe how everyday life close to death was experienced and dealt with in families with one member who had a life-threatening illness. We performed 28 individual, couple, and group interviews with five families. We found two patterns, namely, “being me in a family living close to death” and “being us in a family living close to death.” “Being me” meant that everyone in the family individually had to deal with the impending death, regardless of whether he or she was the person with the life-threatening illness or not. This was linked to ways of promoting the own self-image, of “me-ness.” This pattern was present at the same time as the pattern of “being us,” in other words, being a family, and dealing with impending death and a new “we-ness,” as a group. “Striving for the optimal way of living close to death” was the core theme.

  • 3.
    Friberg, Febe
    et al.
    University of Stavanger.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC. Göteborgs universitet.
    Reflective exploration of Beekman's "participant experience"2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 273-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Being in the patient position: experiences of health care among people with irritable bowel syndrome2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1116-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to gain in-depth understanding of what it is like for a person with irritable bowel syndrome to be in the patient position in encounters with health care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with nine individuals. Our analysis, guided by interpretive description, revealed experiences of unsupportive and supportive encounters. Unsupportive encounters were shaped by humiliation, insignificance, and abandonment. Not feeling believed and acknowledged as persons made the participants lose trust in their own experience, which enhanced their unfamiliar mood of being in the world. Supportive encounters were less prominent. These were characterized by openness and acknowledgment of the patient's lifeworld. Feeling significant and being listened to promoted feelings of being in a partnered, cocreating relationship. It is reasonable to assume that care originating in the patient's lifeworld would support the patients to use their strength to manage illness and regain familiarity in everyday life.

  • 5.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköpings universitet .
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan, Stockholm.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Skaraborgs sjukhus.
    Christiansen, Mats
    Karolinska institutet.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless.2015In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. James, Inger
    et al.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Gustavsson, Bengt
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Knowledge Constructions in Nursing Practice: Understanding and Integrating Different Forms of Knowledge2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 1500-1518Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. James, Inger
    et al.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    The encounter between informal and professional care at the end of life2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 258-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to obtain and describe in-depth knowledge about family carers' experiences of the encounter, in a hospital, between informal and professional care at the end of life. A hermeneutic approach was chosen, and we conducted interviews with 27 family carers 6 to 8 months after their loved one's death. In the encounter, the family carers made their own assessment of their loved one's condition and situation. The professionals' attitudes could both promote and impede the interaction between the two forms of care. Family carers' care actions were characterized by struggling to get treatment, being left behind, being partners, keeping the illness at a distance, hovering beside their loved one, waiting for death, and being experts and protectors. The main interpretation of the findings is that family carers possess practical knowledge about what care is the best, or least harmful, for their loved one. This can be linked to what Aristotle called phronesis.

  • 8.
    Juuso, Päivi
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Olsson, Malin
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Meanings of being received and met by others as experienced by women with fibromyalgia2014In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1381-1390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome that mostly affects middle-aged women. Our aim with this study was to elucidate meanings of being received and met by others as experienced by women with FM. Interviews with a narrative approach were conducted with 9 women. We analyzed the transcribed interviews with a phenomenological hermeneutical interpretation. The findings revealed two themes: being seen as a malingerer and being acknowledged. Meanings of being received and met by others, as experienced by women with FM, can be understood as a movement between the two perspectives. When they were acknowledged, their feelings of security and trust increased, but the women could not rely on this because others received and met them in such an unpredictable manner.

  • 9. Kenne Sarenmalm, E
    et al.
    Thorén-Jönsson, A-L
    Gaston-Johansson, F
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Making sense of living under the shadow of death: adjusting to a recurrent breast cancer illness2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 1116-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women with recurrent breast cancer face many difficulties and challenges, from clinical symptoms of disease progression and treatment to a range of emotional responses. Guided by grounded theory methodology, we explored the main concerns of women with recurrent breast cancer, and how they were dealing with their situations. Data were collected from 40 in-depth interviews with 20 women diagnosed with recurrent breast cancer. The core category illustrated the process of “making sense of living under the shadow of death,” and was based on the women's experiences of adjusting to living with a persistent life-threatening illness. Confronting a recurrence of breast cancer was a life-altering event. Moving through a difficult and challenging time, women eased their distress by letting go of losses and reassessing important values. Through a personal transition women transcended living with a life-threatening illness. These findings emphasize the importance of recognizing existential distress in clinical practice.

  • 10. Nordgren, Lena
    et al.
    Asp, Margareta
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Living With Moderate-Severe Chronic Heart Failure as a Middle-Aged Person2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 4-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the authors describe a study focusing on middle-aged persons living with chronic heart failure (CHF), a group with which few studies have been conducted. They used the lifeworld perspective to focus on persons' lived experiences of the phenomenon, that is, living with moderate-severe CHF as a middle-aged person. They interviewed 7 middle-aged persons (4 men, 3 women; aged 38 to 65 years) and analyzed the data obtained using a phenomenological approach. The phenomenon's essence is described as a life situation characterized by a failing body, a life constantly under threat, a rapidly changing health condition, and an altered self-image, which implies that the persons live in a changed life situation. The essence was further illuminated by three meaning constituents: an ambiguity of the body, losing track of life, and balancing life. Knowledge from this study will help caregivers understand and support patients with this debilitating condition.

  • 11. Nygren, Björn
    et al.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Lundman, Berit
    Inner strength as disclosed in narratives of the oldest old.2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 1060-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of inner strength when very old as narrated by women and men 85 and 90 years old. The authors used a phenomenological hermeneutical method to analyze interviews from 11 women and 7 men, aged either 85 or 90, who scored high on scales measuring phenomena related to inner strength. The following themes emerged from the analysis: feeling competent in oneself yet having faith in others, looking on the bright side of life without hiding from the dark, feeling eased and also being active, being the same yet growing into a new garment, and living in a connected present but also in the past and the future. The authors understood the meaning as Life Goes On--Living It All. To illuminate this meaning further, the authors related the findings to the Aristotelian virtues and the golden mean, and to developmental theory.

  • 12.
    Olsson, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Skär, Lisa
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Meanings of feeling well for women with multiple sclerosis2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1254-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In research concerning multiple sclerosis (MS), the factors that impact on people's well-being and quality of life have been studied, but little has been written about what it means to feel well for women with MS. Therefore, in this study our aim was to describe meanings of feeling well for women with MS. We interviewed 15 women with MS, and a phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was utilized to analyze the interviews. Through this study it can be understood that finding a pace where daily life goes on means that women with MS feel well when the illness is kept in check and is not the dominant experience. The findings of this study can be used to confirm women's experiences of feeling well, despite living with the consequences of MS. Health care professionals will find the results of this study useful when they reflect on and formulate the care of women with MS when attempting to support the latter's desire to feel well in their daily lives.

  • 13.
    Olsson, Malin
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Stafström, Lena
    Region Norrbotten.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Meanings of fatigue for women with Parkinson’s disease2013In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existing knowledge of women’s experiences of living with Parkinson’s disease and fatigue is limited. To gain first-hand knowledge, we interviewed 11 women using a phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation. The results indicate that the familiar daily routines of women with Parkinson’s disease had changed in the sense that their bodily attachment to the world had been altered. The body no longer provided smooth access to the surrounding world; rather, the body served as a barrier to daily living. In practice, understanding this barrier can be significant in recognizing how to create positive conditions that support the women’s experiences and how to formulate their care in congruence with their needs.

  • 14.
    Thoresen, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Oslo universitet, Norge.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta sjukhus, Stockholm, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lived Observations: Linking the Researcher's Personal Experiences to Knowledge Development.2015In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 1589-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As researchers in palliative care, we recognize how involvement with seriously ill and dying persons has an impact on us. Using one's own senses, emotional and bodily responses in observations might open intersubjective dimensions of the research topic. The aim of the article is to highlight how phenomenological theories on intersubjectivity can be useful to develop rich and transparent data generation and analysis. We present three field note examples from observation in a hospice ward, which illuminate how researcher awareness of aspects of intersubjectivity can add valuable insights to data and analysis. Out of the examples, we elaborate on three arguments: (a) how the researcher's lived experience of time and space during fieldwork triggers new research questions, (b) how observations as an embodied activity can bring new insights and open new layers of meaning, and (c) the value of observations in gaining insight into relational aspects in a hospice.

  • 15.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Evocation of meaning through poetic condensation of narratives in empirical phenomenological inquiry into human suffering2003In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 557-66Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
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