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  • 1.
    Dröes, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Vermeer, Yvette
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Libert, Sébastien
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Gaber, Sophie
    Karolinska institutet.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Karolinska institutet.
    Rai, Harleen
    University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Cavalcanti Barroso, Aline
    University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    van der Molen-van Santen, Joeke
    Amsterdam UMC, the Netherlands.
    Mangiaracina, Floriana
    Amsterdam UMC, the Netherlands.
    Beentjes, Kim
    Amsterdam UMC, the Netherlands.
    Bartels, Sara
    Maastricht University, the Netherlands.
    Christie, Hannah
    Maastricht University, the Netherlands.
    Miranda, Rose
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.
    van Dael, Annelien
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.
    Shiells, Kate
    Univerzita Karlova, the Czech Republic.
    Pinto Bruno, Ángel C.
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Alejandra Diaz, Angie
    IDES, Spain.
    Van den Block, Lieve
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.
    Pivodic, Lara
    Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska institutet.
    Franco Martin, Manuel
    IDES, Spain.
    Higgs, Paul
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Holmerova, Iva
    Univerzita Karlova, the Czech Republic.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska institutet.
    Meiland, Franka
    Amsterdam UMC, the Netherlands.
    van der Roest, Henriëtte
    IDES, Spain.
    Schneider, Justine
    University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    van Straten, Annemieke
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Verhey, Frans
    Maastricht University, the Netherlands.
    de Vugt, Marjolein
    Maastricht University, the Netherlands.
    Orrell, Martin
    University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Best Practice Guidance: Human Interaction with Technology in Dementia: Recommendations based on the research conducted in the Marie Sklodowska Curie International Training Network INDUCT2019Book (Other academic)
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  • 2.
    Evans-Lacko, Sara
    et al.
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Bhatt, Jem
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Comas-Herrera, Adelina
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    D'Amico, Francesco
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Farina, Nicolas
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Gaber, Sophie
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Knapp, Martin
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Salcher-Konrad, Maximilian
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Stevens, Madeleine
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Wilson, Emma
    London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom.
    Attitudes to dementia survey results2019In: World Alzheimer Report 2019: Attitudes to dementia / [ed] Alzheimer’s Disease International, London: Alzheimer’s Disease International , 2019, p. 21-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 3.
    Gaber, Sophie
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Klarare, Anna
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Mattsson, Elisabet
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Karlsson Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet.
    A comparison of perceptions of caring behaviours among women in homelessness, Registered Nurses and nursing students2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 959-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The population of women in homelessness in Europe is increasing and women in homelessness experience multiple healthcare needs. However, there is insufficient understanding about how perceptions of caring behaviours compare between women in homelessness as patients and nurses in their clinical practice.

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate perceptions of caring behaviours among women in homelessness, Registered Nurses and nursing students.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional design was used with convenience sampling to recruit groups of women in homelessness (n = 37), Registered Nurses (n = 92) and nursing students (n = 142) in Stockholm, Sweden. Between August 2019 and December 2020, data were collected through face-to-face interviews or online, using the Caring Behaviours Inventory-24 instrument. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and group-comparing hypothesis tests.

    RESULTS: Overall, women in homelessness' perceptions of caring behaviours were significantly lower than nursing students (p < 0.001), who in turn scored significantly lower than Registered Nurses (p < 0.001). The Knowledge and Skill domain had the highest score, and the Connectedness domain had the lowest score in all three groups. The ranking of the individual items according to score varied between the groups. However, all three groups had the highest score for the Knowing how to give shots, IVs, etc., item and the lowest score for the Helping the patient to grow item.

    CONCLUSION: Healthcare providers and nurse educators should consider incongruences and congruences in caring behaviours to better prepare Registered Nurses and nursing students to contribute to increased health equity, and more targeted clinical practice for women in homelessness.

  • 4.
    Gaber, Sophie N.
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    The role of technology around stigma: Marie’s journey2019In: World Alzheimer Report 2019: Attitudes to dementia / [ed] Alzheimer’s Disease International, London: Alzheimer’s Disease International , 2019, p. 162-163Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 5.
    Gaber, Sophie N.
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Heuchemer, Birgit
    Helix rättspsykiatri; Karolinska institutet.
    Dementia in prisons: How to address the double stigma of people with dementia or memory issues in prisons and forensic institutions2019In: World Alzheimer Report 2019: Attitudes to dementia / [ed] Alzheimer’s Disease International, London: Alzheimer’s Disease International , 2019, p. 140-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 6.
    Gaber, Sophie N.
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska institutet.
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska institutet; Malmö universitet.
    Charlesworth, Georgina
    University College London, United Kingdom; North East London NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska institutet.
    Social Participation in Relation to Technology Use and Social Deprivation: A Mixed Methods Study Among Older People with and without Dementia2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 11, article id E4022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social participation is a modifiable determinant for health and wellbeing among older people; however, social participation is increasingly dependent on technology use. This study investigated social participation in relation to Everyday Technology use and social deprivation of the living environment, among older people with and without dementia in the United Kingdom. Sixty-four people with dementia and sixty-four people without dementia were interviewed using standardized questionnaires: The Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside Home Questionnaire and Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire. A mixed methods approach integrated statistical analyses and content analysis of free-text responses, through data visualizations. Small, statistically significant associations were found between social participation and Everyday Technology use outside home, for participants with dementia (Rs = 0.247; p = 0.049) and without dementia (Rs = 0.343; p = 0.006). A small, statistically significant association was identified between social participation and social deprivation in the living environment, among only participants with dementia (Rs = 0.267, p = 0.033). The content analysis and graphical joint display revealed motivators, considerations that require extra attention, and strategies for managing social participation. The results underline how Everyday Technology use can be assistive to social participation but also the need to consider social deprivation of the living environment, especially among people with dementia.

  • 7.
    Gaber, Sophie N.
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska institutet.
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö universitet.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska insitutet.
    Everyday technologies and public space participation among people with and without dementia2019In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, E-ISSN 1911-9828, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 400-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Occupational therapists support everyday technology use; however, it is necessary to consider the challenges that people with dementia encounter with everyday technologies when participating in various places within public space.

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to explore stability and change in participation in places visited within public space in relation to the relevance of everyday technologies used within public space.

    Method: People with dementia (n = 35) and people with no known cognitive impairment (n = 34) were interviewed using the Participation in Activities and Places Outside Home Questionnaire and the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire. Data analysis used modern and classical test theory.

    Findings: Both samples participated in places within public space; however, participation and relevance of everyday technologies were significantly lower for the dementia group.

    IMPLICATIONS: To enable participation, occupational therapists need to be aware of challenges that technologies and places within public space present to people with dementia.

  • 8.
    Gaber, Sophie Nadia
    Karolinska institutet.
    The participation of older people with and without dementia in public space, through the lens of everyday technology use2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation in activities and places within public space has been linked to numerous health benefits and yet, little is known about participation among older people with and without dementia. Insights about participation in activities and places within public space can contribute to the somewhat ambiguous definition of participation, as “involvement in a life situation”, by acknowledging the complexity and interrelatedness of subjective, social, contextual, temporal, and technological aspects of participation. Thus, the overarching aim of the four studies was to explore participation in activities and places within public space, among older people with and without dementia in two European countries (Sweden and UK), and to evaluate how different aspects, such as the relevance and perceived ability to use Everyday Technologies (ETs), interact with and influence participation, over time.

    Across all studies, interviews used the Participation in Activities and Places Outside Home Questionnaire (ACT-OUT) and the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), in order to focus on the perspectives of older people with and without dementia themselves. Study one explored stability and changes in participation in places visited within public space in relation to the relevance of ETs used in public space, among a baseline Swedish sample. Study two utilised ordinal regression to investigate the ways in which perceived risks and ET use were associated with out-of-home participation, among a UK sample of older people. Using a mixed methods design and data visualisations, study three delved into aspects of social participation in more depth, including ET use and social deprivation of the living environment, among two UK sub-samples of older people with and without dementia. Study four’s longitudinal design and multilevel modelling deepened the knowledge about how use of ET outside home, relates to participation in places visited within public space among a Swedish sample of older people with dementia over time.

    Study one’s findings demonstrated a statistically significant positive association between a higher person measure of ability to use ETs and higher participation in places visited within public space, among the Swedish sub-sample of older people with dementia but not those without dementia. According to the ordinal regression model in study two, a higher probability of ET use was associated with a higher level of out-of-home participation, among the UK sample of older people. By elucidating motivators, considerations that require extra attention, and management strategies among UK sub-samples of older people with and without dementia, study three provided insights into the nuances of social participation. Finally, study four’s findings revealed that decreasing use of ET outside home was associated with decreasing participation in places visited within public space, in a statistically significant way when accounting for age.

    In summary, this thesis contributes empirical insights about the participation of older people with and without dementia in activities and places within public space, through the lens of ET use. Such knowledge can be used to develop targeted health and social care planning and the design of more inclusive places, technologies, and services.

  • 9.
    Gaber, Sophie Nadia
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska institutet; Malmö universitet.
    Charlesworth, Georgina
    University College London, United Kingdom; North East London NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska institutet.
    Perceived risks, concession travel pass access and everyday technology use for out-of-home participation: cross-sectional interviews among older people in the UK.2020In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The health-promoting qualities of participation as an opportunity for social and cognitive engagement are well known. Use of Everyday Technology such as Smartphones or ATMs, as enabling or disabling factors for out-of-home participation is however under-researched, particularly among older people with and without dementia. Out-of-home participation involves participation in places and activities outside of a person's home, in public space. Situated within the context of an increasingly technological society, the study investigated factors such as perceived risks, access to a concession travel pass and use of Everyday Technologies, and their relationship with out-of-home participation, among older people in the UK.

    METHODS: One hundred twenty-eight older people with and without dementia in urban and rural environments in the UK, were interviewed using the Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside Home (ACT-OUT) Questionnaire and the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ). Associations between Everyday Technology use, perceived risk of falling, functional impairment, access to a concession travel pass and out-of-home participation were investigated using ordinal regression.

    RESULTS: A higher probability of Everyday Technology use (Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.492; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 1.041-1.127), perceived risk of falling outside home (OR = 2.499; 95% CI = 1.235-5.053) and, access to a concession travel pass (OR = 3.943; 95% CI = 1.970-7.893) were associated with a higher level of out-of-home participation. However, other types of risk (getting lost; feeling stressed or embarrassed) were not associated with out-of-home participation. Having a functional impairment was associated with a low probability of a higher level of out-of-home participation (OR = .470; 95% CI = .181-1.223). Across the sample, 'outside home' Everyday Technologies were used to a higher degree than 'portable' Everyday Technologies which can be used both in and outside home.

    CONCLUSIONS: The study provides insights into perceived risks, access to a concession travel pass and use of Everyday Technologies, and their relationship with out-of-home participation, among older people in the UK. Increased knowledge about factors associated with out-of-home participation may help to guide targeted health and social care planning.

  • 10.
    Gaber, Sophie Nadia
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Nygård, Louise
    Malmö universitet.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska institutet.
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska institutet; Malmö universitet.
    Hedman, Annicka
    Karolinska institutet; FoU Nordost, Danderyd.
    Enacting citizenship through participation in a technological society: a longitudinal three-year study among people with dementia in Sweden2023In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 276-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of Everyday Technology (ET) use is presented as subsidiary or neutral in policy for age- and dementia-friendly communities; and yet, research suggests that older people, especially those with dementia, experience increased challenges using ET in their everyday lives. Through the lens of micro-citizenship, the study aims to deepen the knowledge about how use of ET outside the home, including portable ETs, relates to participation in places visited within public space among people with dementia over time. Using a longitudinal study design, 35 people with dementia were recruited at baseline and followed over three years. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews using standardised questionnaires: the Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside Home Questionnaire (ACT-OUT) and the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ). Random intercept modelling and descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Throughout the three-year study, decreasing use of ET outside the home, including portable ETs, was associated with decreasing participation in places visited within public space, in a statistically significant way when controlling for age (F = 7.59, p = 0.01). The findings indicate that facilitating access and use of ET outside the home, among people with dementia, should be integral to promoting and maintaining participation in age- and dementia-friendly communities.

  • 11.
    Gaber, Sophie
    et al.
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Department of Health Care Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Rosenblad, Andreas Karlsson
    Uppsala universitet; Karolinska institutet.
    Mattsson, Elisabet
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Department of Health Care Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Klarare, Anna
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Department of Health Care Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    The relationship between attitudes to homelessness and perceptions of caring behaviours: A cross-sectional study among women experiencing homelessness, nurses and nursing students2022In: BMC Women's Health, E-ISSN 1472-6874, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Women experiencing homelessness have complex and multifaceted healthcare needs and yet they are an underserved population across healthcare services. Nurses are trained to perform an integral role in the provision of equitable healthcare and their attitudes towards homelessness may therefore influence the care that women experiencing homelessness receive. This study aimed to examine correlations between attitudes towards homelessness and caring behaviours, and to test if these correlations differed between the groups of women experiencing homelessness, registered nurses, and nursing students.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional design using convenience sampling was used to recruit women experiencing homelessness (n = 37), registered nurses (n = 90), and nursing students (n = 138) in Stockholm, Sweden between August 2019 and December 2020. The participants answered two questionnaires: the Attitudes Toward Homelessness Inventory and the Caring Behaviours Inventory-24. Correlations between ordinal variables were calculated using Spearman's rank correlation ρ. Tests of equality between two independent correlations were performed using a Z-test applied to Fisher's z-transformed correlations. An advisory board of women with lived experience of homelessness supported the interpretation of the results.

    RESULTS: Weak, negative correlations were identified between the Attitudes Toward Homelessness Inventory and Caring Behaviours Inventory-24. The Attitudes Toward Homelessness Inventory mean total scores (SD) were 4.1 (0.6), 4.2 (0.6), 4.1 (0.5) points for the women experiencing homelessness, registered nurse, and nursing student groups, respectively, with the corresponding scores for the Caring Behaviours Inventory-24 being 4.1 (1.1), 5.2 (0.5), 4.8 (0.7) points, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: To promote equitable health for women experiencing homelessness, healthcare providers and nurse educators should consider the role of stigmatising attitudes in relation to caring behaviours.

  • 12.
    Gaber, Sophie
    et al.
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Thalen, Liv
    Karolinska institutet.
    Malinowsky, Camilla W.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Margot-Cattin, Isabel
    Karolinska Institutet; University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland, Switzerland.
    Seetharaman, Kishore
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Chaudhury, Habib
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Cutchin, Malcolm
    Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences, USA.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska institutet; Malmö universitet.
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Biglieri, Samantha
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Social Citizenship Through Out-of-Home Participation Among Older Adults With and Without Dementia2022In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 2362-2373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited empirical knowledge about how older adults living with dementia enact their social citizenship through out-of-home participation. This study aimed: (a) to investigate out-of-home participation among older adults with and without dementia in four countries and (b) to compare aspects of stability or change in out-of-home participation. Using a cross-sectional design, older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia and without dementia, aged 55 years and over, were interviewed using the Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside the Home questionnaire in Canada (n = 58), Sweden (n = 69), Switzerland (n = 70), and the United Kingdom (n = 128). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a two-way analysis of variance. After adjustment for age, diagnosis of dementia and country of residence had significant effects on total out-of-home participation (p < .01). The results contribute to policies and development of programs to facilitate social citizenship by targeting specific activities and places.

  • 13.
    Gaber, Sophie
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    People with dementia In Public Space using Everyday Technology (PIPSET) (IRAS 215654): Lay Research Report2020Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Money, Arthur G.
    et al.
    Brunel University London, United Kingdom.
    Atwal, Anita
    South Bank University, United Kingdom.
    Boyce, Emily
    North London Forensic Service, United Kingdom; Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust, United Kingdom.
    Gaber, Sophie
    Karolinska institutet.
    Windeatt, Susan
    CIS Westminster Rehabilitation Service, United Kingdom; CNWL NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom.
    Alexandrou, Kyriakos
    Programonks, Cyprus.
    Falls Sensei: a serious 3D exploration game to enable the detection of extrinsic home fall hazards for older adults2019In: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, E-ISSN 1472-6947, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Falls are the main cause of death and injury for older adults in the UK. Many of these falls occur within the home as a result of extrinsic falls risk factors such as poor lighting, loose/uneven flooring, and clutter. Falls education plays an important role in self-management education about extrinsic hazards and is typically delivered via information leaflets, falls apps, and educational booklets. Serious games have the potential of delivering an engaging and informative alternative to traditional methods but almost exclusively, these are currently delivered as exergaming applications that focus solely on intrinsic falls risk factors. This study presents 'Falls Sensei' a first-person 3D exploration game that aims to educate older adults about extrinsic falls risk factors within the home environment. After presenting Falls Sensei, game usability and older adults' perceptions and attitudes towards using the game in practice are explored.

    METHODS: This study involved 15 community dwelling older adults. After playing the Falls Sensei game, participants completed a Systems Usability Scale (SUS) questionnaire and post task interview, and follow-up interviews three weeks later. Inductive and deductive thematic template analysis, informed by the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model, was used to analyse the think-aloud, post-task and follow-up interview transcripts. Descriptive statistical analysis and one-sampled t-tests were used to analyse log-file data and SUS responses.

    RESULTS: Three high-level themes emerged from the analysis of transcriptions: Performance Expectancy; Effort Expectancy; Social Influence. The SUS score was 77.5/100 which indicates 'Good' levels of usability. Interestingly, reported usability of the game increased with participant age. Participants were positive about the usability of the game (p < = 0.05 for 9/10 items). The most memorable fall hazards were those most commonly encountered in the game or those most challenging to participants.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results support the use of serious games as an engaging tool for educating older adults about extrinsic falls risk factors. Awareness of home hazard detection was raised by the game, and some older adults became more aware for the need to adapt their own homes after gameplay. Further research would be needed to draw comparisons with established interventions.

  • 15.
    Palmgren, Marianne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet; Mälardalens universitet.
    Rosenberg, Lena
    Jönköping University; Karolinska Institutet.
    Gaber, Sophie
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Karin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Family members' reasoning in relation to pleasant environments in nursing homes2023In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 235-251, article id 14713012221142474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical environment plays an important role in how everyday life is shaped and experienced for persons living in nursing homes as well as for the residents' family and friends. Still, there is a scarcity of research exploring the perspectives of family members of residents regarding everyday life in common areas in nursing homes. In this study, we chose the term, 'a pleasant place', with the ambition of remaining open to various ideas and aspects that family members perceive as relevant when reasoning about the nursing home environment. The study aimed to explore how family members of nursing home residents reason in relation to pleasant places in nursing homes. Four focus group sessions were conducted with a total of 14 family members. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in four themes. 'A door ajar', highlighted the importance of a nursing home environment that provides potential opportunities for pleasurable everyday moments. 'Why does it have to be so ugly?', revealed how family members perceived institutional logics as guiding the design of the nursing homes, which were misaligned with the logics of a pleasant place. 'A place to care for?', emphasised the physical environment as an integrated aspect of care, in terms of being carefully arranged and used with sensitivity. Finally, 'allegiance to the place' showed that despite the family members' recognitions of shortcomings in the nursing home physical environments, their allegiance to the place provided a sense of the nursing home as a pleasant place. The study contributes knowledge regarding the perceived value of the design of the physical environment in nursing homes, particularly in common areas, as an integral aspect of care, and moves beyond the ideas of homelike and non-institutional nursing home environments.

  • 16.
    Thalén, Liv
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska institutet.
    Margot-Cattin, Isabel
    Karolinska institutet; School of Social Work and Health, Lausanne, Switzerland; University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Western Switzerland, Delémont, Switzerland.
    Gaber, Sophie
    Marie Cederschiöld University, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska institutet; Uppsala universitet.
    Seetharaman, Kishore
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada.
    Chaudhury, Habib
    Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada.
    Cutchin, Malcolm
    Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences, Yakima, USA.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Karolinska institutet.
    Anders, Kottorp
    Karolinska institutet; Malmö universitet.
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska institutet.
    Out-of-home participation among people living with dementia: A study in four countries2022In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 21, no 5, article id 14713012221084173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social participation in out-of-home activities is important for people living with dementia, yet little is known about such participation. The aim of this study was to explore and compare out-of-home participation among people living with dementia in four countries by assessing different types of places of participation visited or no longer visited. A cross-sectional design was used to gather self-reported experiences concerning out-of-home participation among people with mild stage dementia living in Canada (n = 29), Sweden (n = 35), Switzerland (n = 35) and the UK (n = 64). Interviews were conducted using the Participation in ACTivities and places OUTside the Home for older adults (ACT-OUT) instrument. Participants still visited 16 (Median) places out of a possible total of 24, and they had abandoned 5 (Median) places. Neighbourhood was the place most participants still visited, whereas 50% of them had stopped going to a Sports facility, with no significant differences between country samples regarding how many participants had abandoned that place (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.01). There were significant differences between country samples in the frequency of present participation and abandonment of the Hospital, Dentist's office, Cemetery, Garden, and Forest (Fisher's exact test, all p < 0.01). Although the participants still visited a variety of places, they had stopped going to places previously visited, which indicates reductions in participation, posing an inherent risk to well-being. The similarities and differences across samples from the four countries suggest that healthcare services and access to public transport may contribute to the complex interactional process of out-of-home participation for people living with dementia. The findings highlight the need for initiatives targeting specific types of places to support continued participation in society, especially places at a higher risk of abandonment such as places for recreation and physical activity.

  • 17.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska institutet.
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska institutet.
    Charlesworth, Georgina
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Lee, Jenica
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Walsh, Ryan
    Washington University School of Medicine, USA.
    Gaber, Sophie
    Karolinska institutet; University College London, United Kingdom.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö universitet.
    The perceived challenge of everyday technologies in Sweden, the United States and England: exploring differential item functioning in the everyday technology use questionnaire2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 554-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The changing technological environment is reflected in regular updates made to the everyday technology (ET) use questionnaire (ETUQ). Newly added ETs may not present comparable challenges across countries and diagnoses.

    Aims: To identify whether country context, or dementia diagnosis, impact ETs' challenge level.

    Material and methods: 315 older adults from three countries were included; Sweden (n = 73), United States (n = 114), England (n = 128), and had a confirmed diagnosis of mild dementia (n = 99) or no known cognitive impairment (n = 216). Differential Items Functioning (DIF) analysis was performed on 88 ETs included in the ETUQ by country and diagnosis. The impact of DIF was evaluated in a Differential Test Functioning (DTF) analysis.

    Results: Nine items (10.2%) in the ETUQ showed statistically significant DIF between countries; five of which were public space ETs and none of which were information and communication technologies (ICTs). Three ICT items, and no others, showed significant DIF by diagnosis. The items' DIF was shown to have no impact upon person measures of ability to use ET in the DTF.

    Conclusions and significance: The utility of the ETUQ in occupational therapy practice and research internationally is highlighted through the stability of the challenge hierarchy and lack of impact on person measures.

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