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  • 1.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    I rörelse mot hopp - hälsostödjande familjesamtal i palliativ vård2008In: Omsorg: Nordisk tidsskrift for Palliativ Medisin, ISSN 0800-7489, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 19-22Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Benzein, Eva G
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Berg, Agneta C
    The level of and relation between hope, hopelessness and fatigue in patients and family members in palliative care.2005In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 234-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hope, hopelessness and fatigue are important experiences for patients and family members in palliative care. The aim of the study was to describe the level of and relation between hope, hopelessness and fatigue in patients and family members in palliative care. Eighty-five participants completed the Herth Hope Index, Beck's Hopelessness Scale and rated their level of fatigue from none to severe. The level of hope proved to be significantly lower among the family members than among the patients. For the family members, correlations were found between hope and age (-0.358*), fatigue and hope (-0.439*), hopelessness and age (0.484**), age and fatigue (0.403**) and between hope and hopelessness (-0.723**). For the patients, correlations were found between age and hopelessness (0.555**) and between hopelessness and hope (-0.580**). Efforts to increase the experience of hope and decrease hopelessness and fatigue must include not only the patient but also the family members. (* =P <0.5, ** =P <0.01)

  • 3.
    Benzein, Eva Gunilla
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Hagberg, Margaretha
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    'Being appropriately unusual': a challenge for nurses in health-promoting conversations with families2008In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 106-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the theoretical assumptions and the application for health-promoting conversations, as a communication tool for nurses when talking to patients and their families. The conversations can be used on a promotional, preventive and healing level when working with family-focused nursing. They are based on a multiverse, salutogenetic, relational and reflecting approach, and acknowledge each person's experience as equally valid, and focus on families' resources, and the relationship between the family and its environment. By posing reflective questions, reflection is made possible for both the family and the nurses. Family members are invited to tell their story, and they can listen to and learn from each other. Nurses are challenged to build a co-creating partnership with families in order to acknowledge them as experts on how to lead their lives and to use their own expert knowledge in order to facilitate new meanings to surface. In this way, family health can be enhanced.

  • 4.
    Benzein, Eva Gunilla
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Health-promoting conversations about hope and suffering with couples in palliative care.2008In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 439-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Families living with a dying relative face existential challenges which need to be met by caregivers in a dialogue. AIM: To describe couples' experiences of participating in nurse-initiated health-promoting conversations about hope and suffering during home-based palliative care. METHOD: Data comprised semi-structured evaluative interviews with six couples. Each couple together had previously participated in three health-fostering conversations with nurses. Data were analyzed by content. RESULT: Talking with nurses about existential issues such as hope and suffering made couples feel that they were part of a trustful relationship, and that it was a healing experience. It gave them the opportunity to unburden themselves, as well as a way of learning and finding new strategies for managing daily life. CONCLUSION: Health-promoting conversations about hope and suffering should be implemented as a natural part of the caring relationship between caregivers and families in the palliative context.

  • 5.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Hagberg, M
    Saveman, B-I
    Familj och sociala relationer2009In: Omvårdnadens grunder: perspektiv och förhållningssätt / [ed] Febe Friberg och Joakim Öhlén, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2009, p. 67-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Johansson, Pauline
    Arestedt, Kristofer Franzén
    Berg, Agneta
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Families' Importance in Nursing Care: Nurses' Attitudes--an instrument development2008In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 97-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the development and testing of a research instrument, Families' Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA), designed to measure nurses' attitudes about the importance of involving families in nursing care. The instrument was inductively developed from a literature review and tested with a sample of Swedish nurses. An item-total correlation and a first principal component analysis were used to validate the final instrument, including a second principal component analysis to analyze dimensionality, and Cronbach's alpha was used to estimate internal consistency. The instrument consists of 26 items and reveals four factors: families as a resource in nursing care, family as a conversational partner, family as a burden, and family as its own resource. Cronbach's alpha was 0.88 for the total instrument and 0.69 to 0.80 for the subscales. The instrument requires further testing with other nurse populations.

  • 7.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Johansson, Pauline
    Arestedt, Kristofer Franzén
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Nurses' attitudes about the importance of families in nursing care: a survey of Swedish nurses2008In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 162-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of registered nurses (RNs) about the importance of involving families in nursing care. A sample of 634 randomly selected Swedish RNs completed the instrument, Families' Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA), and reported holding supportive attitudes about families. High scores were found for the subscales: family as a resource in nursing care, family as a conversational partner, family as a burden, and family as its own resource. Variables that predicted a less supportive attitude about involving families in nursing care included being a newly graduated nurse, having no general approach to the care of families at the place of work, and being a male nurse.

  • 8.
    Benzein, Eva
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    2nd Nordic Family Nursing Conference in Kalmar, Sweden: A brief report.2006In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 344-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Developing nurses’ way to reflect over caring relationships through clinical supervision with a structured reflection; an action research approach2011In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Linköpings universitet.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Linné universitetet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Elmberger, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Gjövik högskola.
    Co-creating possibilities for patients in palliative care to reach vital goals: A multiple case study of home-care nursing encounters2013In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 341-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient's home is a common setting for palliative care. This means that we need to understand current palliative care philosophy and how its goals can be realized in home-care nursing encounters (HCNEs) between the nurse, patient and patient's relatives. The existing research on this topic describes both a negative and a positive perspective. There has, however, been a reliance on interview and descriptive methods in this context. The aim of this study was to explore planned HCNEs in palliative care. The design was a multiple case study based on observations. The analysis includes a descriptive and an explanation building phase. The results show that planned palliative HCNEs can be described as a process of co-creating possibilities for the patient to reach vital goals through shared knowledge in a warm and caring atmosphere, based on good caring relations. However, in some HCNEs, co-creation did not occur: Wishes and needs were discouraged or made impossible and vital goals were not reached for the patients or their relatives. Further research is needed to understand why. The co-creative process presented in this article can be seen as a concretization of the palliative care ideal of working with a person-centered approach.

  • 11.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård. Gjövik University, Norway.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård. Linnéuniversitetet.
    Årestedt, Kristoffer
    Linnéuniversitetet, Linköpings universitet.
    Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in a sample of Swedish family members of patients with life-threatening illness2012In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 930-938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Family members often take on many caring responsibilities, with complex issues and challenges to consider. Feelings of preparedness, competence and reward are identified as concepts that may protect caregiver wellbeing and decrease negative outcomes related to caregiving.

    AIM: This study aimed to translate, adapt and psychometrically evaluate the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in Swedish family members of patients with life threatening illness.

    DESIGN: Correlational.

    SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: The study took place in four settings including advanced palliative care. The scales were tested in a sample of 125 family members of persons with life-threatening illness. All three scales were tested in relation to distribution of item and scale scores, missing data patterns, dimensionality, convergent validity and reliability.

    RESULTS: The results in this study indicate that the Swedish versions of The Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale are valid, reliable and user-friendly scales. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the scales were unidimensional and all demonstrated Cronbach's alpha values of ≥0.9.

    CONCLUSIONS: As a result of this study it is anticipated that the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale could provide a basis for collaborative research between different countries and make international studies more comparable and generalizable despite differences in language and culture.

  • 12.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Meeting the needs of family members of persons with life threatening illness: a support group programme during ongoing palliative care.2011In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping universitet, Linne universitet.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Linnéuniversitetet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet, Stockholms sjukhem.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Gjøvik University College, Norway.
    Effects of a support group programme for patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care2013In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Several studies show that family members report a lack of preparation, knowledge and the ability to handle the caregiver role, and a need for information and psychosocial support. 

    AIM: The aim was to investigate the effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care.

    DESIGN: A prospective quasi-experimental design, including an intervention group and a comparison group, was used.

    SETTINGS/PARTICIPANTS: A support group programme was offered to family members during ongoing palliative care at three intervention settings: two specialist palliative care units and one haematology unit. A fourth setting, a specialist palliative care unit, was used for comparisons.

    RESULTS: Family members taking part in the support group programme significantly increased their perceptions of preparedness for caregiving, competence for caregiving, and rewards of caregiving. Hope, anxiety, depression symptoms and health showed no significant changes.

    CONCLUSIONS: The intervention, including a support group programme delivered to family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care, proved to be effective in certain domains of caregiving. No negative outcomes were detected. The results indicate that this intervention could be implemented and delivered to family members during ongoing palliative care.

  • 14. Johansson, Pauline
    et al.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Kan någon annan tala om hur jag mår?: en studie med patienter, familjemedlemmar och personal om skattning och hantering av sjukdomsrelaterade symtom vid avancerad cancer2007Book (Other academic)
  • 15. Oscarsson, Marie G.
    et al.
    Wijma, B. E.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    'I do not need to... I do not want to... I do not give it priority...: why women choose not to attend cervical cancer screening2008In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 26-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To describe and interpret why women with no cervical smear taken during the previous 5 years choose not to attend a cervical cancer screening (CCS) programme.

    BACKGROUND:

    CCS programme is a service for early detection of cervical cancer. Today, some women choose not to attend the programme.

    DESIGN:

    Data were collected by tape-recorded interviews and analysed by qualitative inductive content analysis.

    SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

    Purposive sample of 14 women in southeast Sweden, who had chosen not to attend CCS during the previous 5 years.

    FINDINGS:

    The following themes were revealed: I do not need to..., I do not want to... and I do not give it priority.... The women had a positive attitude to CCS but as long as they felt healthy, they chose not to attend. A negative body image, low self-esteem, feelings of discomfort when confronted with the gynaecological examination and fear of the results also influenced their non-attendance. The women prioritized more important things in life and reported various degrees of lack of trust in health-care.

    CONCLUSION:

    Women's choice not to attend CCS were complex and influenced by present and earlier intra- and inter-personal circumstances. They had a positive attitude to CCS, but other things in life were more important. Health-care professionals have to facilitate a co-operative discussion with the women in order to contribute to a mutual understanding for the perspectives of the women and the professionals

  • 16. Oscarsson, Marie G.
    et al.
    Wijma, Barbro E.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Nonattendance in a Cervical Cancer Screening Program: What Happens if Women's Requirements Are Met?2008In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 183-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we focus on women who have no registered cervical smear during the previous 5 years, their requirements for attendance, and promotive efforts performed. Of the 400 women randomly selected to answer a telephone-based questionnaire about future attendance at cervical cancer screening (CCS), 120 would consider having a cervical smear taken, and 50 of them wanted help to accomplish that. When meeting the women's requirements, such as being assured friendly treatment and a suitable appointment time, the numbers of registered cervical smears were higher for the study group compared with a control group. Still, the most highly resistant women did not attend.

  • 17. Saveman, Britt-Inger
    et al.
    Måhlén, Christina D
    Benzein, Eva G
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Nursing students' beliefs about families in nursing care.2005In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 480-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring for families is a growing part of nurses' professional work in various health care settings and consequently an important issue for nursing education. One way to determine the readiness for nursing students to meet families is to reveal their beliefs about families. Beliefs can be uncovered through interpretation of conversations, as beliefs are embedded in our stories. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students' beliefs about families in nursing care. Nine nursing students, three from each year of a three-year programme, were interviewed individually. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. First, a manifest content analysis was performed followed by a latent content analysis in order to reveal underpinning beliefs. The results demonstrate beliefs about families and nurses and their relationship, for example, if family members are close to each other and when the patient is cared for in his/her own home, it reduces suffering for the whole family, and if nurses create a trusting relationship and atmosphere, it fosters the families' well-being. Although the beliefs uncovered are seen as facilitative ones, educational efforts are essential to implement family nursing both theoretically and practically in curricula throughout the nursing education.

  • 18. Syrén, Susanne M
    et al.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Benzein, Eva G
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Being a family in the midst of living and dying.2006In: Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0825-8597, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 26-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the way of being a family when one family member is in the midst of living and dying. A family systems frame and a life world perspective were used in interviews with five families. A qualitative analysis inspired by Giorgi revealed dialectic and dynamic processes in constant motion within and between the continua being in affinity-being in loneliness, being in power-being in helplessness, and being in continuity-being in disruption. When families were moving in the direction of being in affinity, power, and continuity, these seemed to be prerequisites for enduring their challenged life situation and for giving them a kind of repose. When the movements were in the opposite direction, existential and emotional suffering were manifested as individual embodied experiences such as depression and anxiety.

  • 19. Söderström, Ing-Mari K
    et al.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Hagberg, Margaretha S
    Benzein, Eva G
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Family adaptation in relation to a family member's stay in ICU.2009In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 250-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe and interpret the family adaptation during the ICU hospitalisation and up to 18 months after discharge. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY/DESIGN: A qualitative design was chosen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Individual and family interviews with eight families including 31 family members. A hermeneutical analysis was performed and paradigm cases were constructed. RESULTS: The result is presented in three themes: striving for endurance, striving for consolation and striving to rebuild life under new conditions. The family adaptation started at the onset of the critical incident and continued during the ICU stay and after discharge. The family members metaphorically went through peaks and valleys during the whole process of adaptation. CONCLUSION: Adaptation is an issue for the whole family and is facilitated by being able to stay close to the patient and receive supportive unambiguous information from the staff both during the ICU stay and after discharge.

  • 20. Söderström, Ing-Mari
    et al.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Interactions between family members and staff in intensive care units--an observation and interview study.2006In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 707-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research about interactions between family members and staff are sparse, although family members' needs and experiences in intensive care units are well researched areas. AIM: The aim was to describe and interpret interactions between family members and staff in intensive care units. METHODS: Interviews (n=24) with family members and repeated observations of interactions of family members and staff in intensive care units were performed and analysed together by means of content analysis. RESULTS: The initial interactions between staff and family members had a substantial effect on family members and influenced their further interactions with the staff. Two kinds of interactions were revealed; mutual understanding and mutual misunderstanding. Family members, who understood the explicit information and the implicit messages were open in communication with the staff, adjusted well to the system, were acknowledged by the staff and sometimes consoled. Family members, who had difficulties understanding information and implicit messages drew back from communication with staff, did not adjust to the system and were sometimes insulted by the staff. CONCLUSIONS: Unambiguous information from the staff is important for developing interactions of mutual understanding. The results may be a starting point for intensive care unit staff to reflect on how all family members are initially met and further informed and treated. Further research of family members' experiences of interactions with staff in a longitudinal perspective and the influence of critical illness on families are needed.

  • 21. Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Benzein, Eva
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Sharing living and dying - a balancing act between vulnerability and a sense of security: Enrolled nurses’ experiences of working in the sitting service for dying patients at home2011In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
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