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  • 1.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Me-ness and we-ness in a modified everyday life close to death at home2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching aim of this thesis was to describe how family members experienced everyday life with life-threatening illness close to death, with focus on self-image and identity. The thesis comprises four papers, each with a specific aim to illuminate various aspects of the phenomenon under study. The study population consisted of 29 participants; ten family caregivers and five families, including five patients with life threatening illness and their family members. Data were based on retrospective single interviews (paper I), prospective individual, couple and group interviews with the families over six to eighteen month (papers II-III). Interpretive description approach (papers I, II, IV), narrative method (paper III) and secondary analysis (paper IV) were used to analyze data. The findings show how living close to death influences everyday life at home, at several levels (papers I-IV). From the perspective of the dying person, narrations of daily situations was described by four themes related to identity and everyday life; inside and outside of me, searching for togetherness, my place in space and my death and my time. The changing body, pain, fatigue, decreased physical capacity and changed appearance, appeared to influence the dying person’s need for altered knowledge and community, and as a result the patterns of interaction within the families changed. The strive for knowledge and community took place at home, an arena for identity work and the conscious search for meaning, knowledge and community; it was limited by time and inevitable death (paper III). For the family member, life close to death can mean sharing life with a changing person in a changing relationship (paper II). It may mean that everyday life needs to be modified in order for it to work (papers I-IV). New patterns of dependence and an asymmetrical relationship affect all involved (papers III-IV). Daily life close to death is about finding the space to promote the individual self-image, me-ness, at the same time as finding new ways of being a family; we-ness (paper II). Regardless of being the ill person or not, the family members we interviewed had to face impending death, which challenged earlier ways of living together (papers I-IV). From the perspective of the relatives, the everyday life of caring for the dying family member was characterized by challenged ideals, stretched limits and interdependency (paper I). Situations that challenged the caregivers’ self-image were connected to intimacy, decreasing personal space and experiences such as “forbidden thoughts”. The findings suggest that the bodily changes were of importance for the self-image, and that the former approach to the own body was important in the process of experiencing the body. The person living close to death was in transition to something new; being dead in the near future. One way of handling the struggles of everyday life was to seek togetherness, strive to find other persons with similar experiences while sharing thoughts and feelings. Togetherness was sought within the family, in the health care system and on the internet; a sense of togetherness was also sought with those who had already died. The other family members were also in transition as the future meant living on without the ill family member and changing their status to for example being a widow or being motherless. Identity work close to death denotes creating an access ramp into something new; a transition into the unknown. From a clinical perspective, this study emphasizes the significance of creating a climate that allows caregivers to express thoughts and feelings.

  • 2.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Me-ness och We-ness: Individuell och gruppidentitet hos döende personer och deras familjemedlemmar2013In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Följande artikel är baserad på en avhandling som beskriver människors upplevelser av sin vardag hemma när en i familjen är svårt sjuk och döende och  fokuserar på centrala begrepp som identitet, död och gemenskap. Intervjuer med patienter och deras familjemedlemmar, delvis genomförda över tid, har möjliggjort analyser av berättelser som speglar vardagliga processer, liksom transitioner och rollförändringar. För både patienter och familjemedlemmar medförde vardagen i hemmet en rad fysiska, psykiska och sociala påfrestningar. För familjemedlemmarna innebar det bland annat att dela livet med en förändrad person i en förändrad relation. Vardagen nära döden innebar att möta nya situationer och erfarenheter som utmanade den personliga identiteten; me-ness liksom familjeidentiteten; we-ness.

  • 3.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Dwyer, Lise-Lotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Värdighet och döende2009Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro universitet.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, campus Norrköping.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    The modified self: family caregivers' experiences of caring for a dying family member at home2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 7-8, p. 1097-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore situations in daily life that challenge caregivers’ self-image when caring for a dying family member at home.

    Background: Caregiving affects the health and daily lives of family caregivers. Patterns of challenging situations may provide insight into the home caregiving experience, thus contributing to our understanding on the influence it has on the caregivers self-image.

    Design: Qualitative descriptive study.

    Methods: Ten family caregivers who cared for a dying family member at home with support from an advanced homecare team were interviewed 6-12 months after the death of the family member. The interviews were analysed with interpretive description.

    Result: Three patterns characterised the experiences of caregivers’ daily lives in caring for a dying family member at home: challenged ideals, stretched limits, and interdependency. These patterns formed the core theme, the modified self. Situations that challenged the caregivers’ self-image were connected to experiences such as “forbidden thoughts”, intimacy, and decreasing personal space.

    Conclusions: The caregivers met challenging situations in their daily lives that created a modified image of self. It is important to recognise the impact of caring for a dying family member at home.

    Relevance to clinical practice: The present study argues for supporting family caregivers to maximize their potential to handle the demanding everyday life with a dying family member at home. This study contributes to understanding situations in the home that may challenge caregivers’ self-image, and points out the importance of talking about caregiving experiences. From a clinical perspective the present study emphasizes the significance of creating a climate, which allows family caregivers to express thoughts and feelings. Sharing experiences such as “forbidden thoughts” can be one way of handling the profoundly changed every day life.

  • 5.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Hälsoakademin, Örebro universitet.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, .
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Being me and being us in a family living close to death at home2011In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 683-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used interpretive description to describe how everyday life close to death was experienced and dealt with in families with one member who had a life-threatening illness. We performed 28 individual, couple, and group interviews with five families. We found two patterns, namely, “being me in a family living close to death” and “being us in a family living close to death.” “Being me” meant that everyone in the family individually had to deal with the impending death, regardless of whether he or she was the person with the life-threatening illness or not. This was linked to ways of promoting the own self-image, of “me-ness.” This pattern was present at the same time as the pattern of “being us,” in other words, being a family, and dealing with impending death and a new “we-ness,” as a group. “Striving for the optimal way of living close to death” was the core theme.

  • 6.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Hälsoakademin, Örebro universitet.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköpings universitet, .
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Four aspects of self-image close to death at home2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 5931-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living close to death means an inevitable confrontation with one’s own existential limitation. In this article, we argue that everyday life close to death embodies an identity work in progress. We used a narrative approach and a holistic-content reading to analyze twelve interviews conducted with three persons close to death. By illuminating the unique stories and identifying patterns among the participants’ narratives, we found four themes exemplifying important aspects of the identity work related to everyday life close to death. Two of the themes, named “Inside and outside of me” and “Searching for togetherness”, represented the core of the self-image, and were framed by the other themes, “My place in space” and “My death and my time”. Our findings elucidate the way the individual stories moved between the past, the present, and the future. This study challenges the idea that everyday life close to impending death primarily means limitations. The findings show that the search for meaning, new knowledge, and community can form a part of a conscious and ongoing identity work close to death. 

  • 7.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Constructing family identity close to death2013In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 379-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daily life close to death involves physical, psychological, and social strain, exposing patients and their family members to major transitions affecting relational patterns and identity. For the individual family member, this often means sharing life with a changing person in a changing relationship, disrupting both individual identity and family identity. Our aim was to deepen the understanding of individual experiences that are important in constructing family identity close to death at home. We performed a secondary analysis of qualitative data collected through 40 interviews with persons with life-threatening illness and the family members who shared everyday life with them. The analysis resulted in interpretive descriptions which provided three patterns important for creating family identity, which we here call “we-ness” close to death. The patterns were: being an existential person, being an extension of the other, and being together in existential loneliness. Together, these three patterns seemed to play a part in the construction of family identity; we-ness, close to death. One important finding was the tension between the search for togetherness in “we-ness” while dealing with an existential loneliness, which seemed to capture an essential aspect of being a family of which one member is dying.

  • 8.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Närstående i hemsjukvården2010In: Hemsjukvård / [ed] Eva Drevenhorn, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1:1, p. 75-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Carlander, Ida
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Holm, Maja
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    James, Inger
    Örebro universitet.
    Sarenmalm, Elisabeth Kenne
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Skaraborgs sjukhus.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    Karolinska institutet, Sophiahemmet högskola, Stockholms sjukhem.
    Lind, Susanne
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Sandgren, Anna
    Jönköping university, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Göteborgs universitet.
    Palliative Care Research: A Systematic Review of foci, designs and methods of research conducted in Sweden between 2007 and 2012.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 5-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, a literature review was undertaken of palliative care research from Sweden during the 1970s-2006, paving the way for a follow-up study to explore the recent developments. The aim was to systematically examine palliative care research from Sweden between 2007 and 2012, with special attention to methods, designs and research foci.

    METHODS: A literature review was undertaken. The databases Academic search elite, Age line, Ahmed, Cinahl, PsychInfo, PubMed, Scopus, Soc abstracts, Web of science and Libris were reviewed for Swedish palliative care research studies published from 2007 to 2012, applying the search criteria 'palliative care OR palliative medicine OR end-of-life care OR terminal care OR hospice care OR dying OR death'.

    RESULTS: A total of 263 papers met the inclusion criteria, indicating an increased volume of research compared to the 133 articles identified in the previous review. Common study foci were symptom assessment and management, experiences of illness and care planning. Targeting non-cancer-specific populations and utilisation of population-based register studies were identified as new features. There was continued domination of cross-sectional, qualitative and mono-disciplinary studies, not including ethnic minority groups, nonverbally communicable people or children <18 years of age.

    CONCLUSIONS: The trend is that Swedish palliative care research has expanded in volume from 2007 to 2012 compared to during the 1970s to 2006, with increasing participation of non-cancer-specific populations. A domination of qualitative approaches and small, cross-sectional studies with few interventions is still characteristic. Still more strategies are needed to expand the knowledge development of palliative care to respond to demographical, epidemiological, therapeutic and healthcare structure changes.

  • 10.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Feelings of Reward among Family Caregivers during Ongoing Palliative Care2014In: Palliative Medicine / [ed] Catherine Walshe, Sage Publications, 2014, p. 613-614Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Palliative family caregivers appear to experience rewards of caregiving concurrent with burdens and negative feelings. Relatively few studies have especially attended to the positive and rewarding aspects in palliative family caregiving. In addition, most studies on rewards are retrospective and examine the experiences of bereaved family caregivers. This study aimed to describe feelings of rewards among family caregivers during ongoing palliative care. A further aim was to compare experience of rewards in relation to sex and age. Methods: The sample consisted of 125 family caregivers and the study took place in three specialist palliative care units and one hematology unit. Participants answered a questionnaire including demographic background questions and the Rewards of Caregiving Scale (RCS). Descriptive statistics were used to describe characteristics of the participants and the level of rewards. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare differences between groups of different sex and age. Results: Palliative family caregivers reported in general high levels of reward.The largest source of rewards was feelings of being helpful to the patient. This was closely followed by rewards as a consequence of giving something to the patients that brought her/him happiness and being there for the patient. The smallest sources of rewards were personally growth, self-satisfaction and personal meaning. There was an association between rewards and age but not between men and women. Conclusions: Family caregivers experienced rewards of caregiving during ongoing palliative care despite their unique and stressful situation. Feelings of rewards seem to be about handling the situation in a satisfying way, to feel competent and confident to take care of the patient and thereby feel proud. Support could preferably be designed aiming to improve family caregiver’s ability to care and to facilitate rewards of caregiving and focus on strengths and resources.

  • 11.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Feelings of rewards among family caregivers during ongoing palliative care2015In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1509-1517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Palliative family caregivers appear to experience the rewards of caregiving concurrent with burdens and negative feelings. Relatively few studies have attended to the positive and rewarding aspects in palliative family caregiving. In addition, most studies on rewards are retrospective and examine the experiences of bereaved family caregivers. The present study aimed at describing feelings of reward among family caregivers during ongoing palliative care. A further aim was to compare the experience of rewards in relation to sex and age. Methods: The sample consisted of 125 family caregivers and took place in three specialist palliative care units and one hematology unit. Participants answered a questionnaire including demographic background questions and the Rewards of Caregiving Scale (RCS). Descriptive statistics were employed to describe characteristics of the participants and the level of rewards. A Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare differences between groups of different sex and age. Results: Palliative family caregivers reported general high levels of reward. The greatest source of rewards involved feelings of being helpful to patients. This was closely followed by giving something to patients that brought them happiness and being there for them. The smallest sources of rewards were related to personal growth, self-satisfaction, and personal meaning. There was also an association between rewards and age but not between men and women. Significance of results: Family caregivers experienced the rewards of caregiving during ongoing palliative care despite their unique and stressful situation. Feelings of reward seem to be about handling a situation in a satisfying way, feeling competent and confident to take care of the patient and thereby feeling proud. Support could preferably be designed to improve a family caregiver's ability to care and to facilitate the positive aspects and rewards of caregiving and focus on strengths and resources.

  • 12.
    Holm, Maja
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Karolinska institutet, Örebro universitet.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköpings universitet, Linnéuniversitetet.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Göteborgs universitet.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet, Capio Geriatrik, Dalen, Stockholm.
    Delivering and participating in a psycho-educational intervention for family caregivers during palliative home care: A qualitative study from the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers2015In: BMC Palliative Care, ISSN 1472-684X, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 14, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family caregivers in palliative care have a need for knowledge and practical support from health professionals, resulting in the need for educational and supportive interventions. However, research has mainly focused on the experiences of family caregivers taking part in interventions. To gain an increased understanding of complex interventions, it is necessary to integrate the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers. Hence, the aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers of delivering and participating in a psycho-educational intervention in specialized palliative home care.

    Methods: A psycho-educational intervention was designed for family caregivers based on a theoretical framework describing family caregiver’s educational, emotional and practical involvement as knowing, being and doing. The intervention was delivered over three sessions, each of which included a presentation to family caregivers by healthcare professionals from an intervention manual based on the theoretical framework. For the qualitative data collection, an interpretive descriptive design was chosen. Data were collected through focus group discussions with health professionals and individual interviews with family caregivers. Data were analysed using framework analysis.

    Results: From the perspectives of both health professionals and family caregivers, the delivering and participating in the intervention was described as a positive experience. Although the content was not always adjusted to the family caregivers’ individual situation, it was perceived as valuable. Consistently, the intervention was regarded as something that could make family caregivers better prepared for caregiving. Health professionals found that the work with the intervention demanded time and engagement from them and that the manual needed to be adjusted to suit group characteristics, but the experience of delivering the intervention was still something that gave them satisfaction and contributed to them finding insights into their work.

    Conclusions: The theoretical framework of knowing, being and doing used in this study seems appropriate to use for the design of interventions to support family caregivers. In the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers, the psycho-educational intervention had important benefits and there was congruence between the two groups in that it provided reward and support. In order for health professionals to carry out psycho-educational interventions, they may be in need of support and supervision as well as securing appropriate time and resources in their everyday work.

  • 13.
    Holm, Maja
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Öhlen, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Preparing for family caregiving in specialized palliative home care: an ongoing process2014In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 767-775Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Wallin, Viktoria
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Karolinska institutet.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet.
    Meanings of eating deficiencies for people admitted to palliative home care2015In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 05, p. 1231-1239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food and eating are embedded in people's everyday social lives: at home with family members and as part of social interactions. For people with progressive life-limiting conditions, however, eating is often obstructed. The objective of the present study was to explore the meanings of living with eating deficiencies at the end of life among people admitted to specialist palliative home care.

    This qualitative inductive study employed an interpretive descriptive approach. A dozen persons, with various diagnoses and eating deficiencies, admitted to two specialist palliative home care units, participated. Data were collected through individual repeated interviews. Data collection and analysis were guided by the interpretive description method.

    The results reveal that eating deficiencies among people with progressive life-limiting conditions are existentially loaded markers of impending death. Finding ways to overcome declined food intake and hampered eating enabled our participants to feel able to influence their own well-being and remain hopeful. The results also showed that the eating deficiencies influenced participants' relationships and social interactions in ways that hampered their possibilities of sharing valuable moments together with friends and family members during the final period of life.

    Efforts to minimize the distress that people experience in relation to the challenges they face with eating deficiencies are important for well-being at the end of life. Person-centered approaches to acknowledge and support individuals' own ways of experiencing and dealing with their eating deficiencies are recommended that include a multidimensional perspective on food and eating.

  • 15.
    Wallin, Viktoria
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska institutet, Ersta sjukhus.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Ersta sjukhus, Karolinska institutet.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Karolinska institutet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Ersta sjukhus, Karolinska institutet, Stockholms sjukhem.
    Håkanson, Cecilia
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Ersta sjukhus, Karolinska institutet.
    Maintaining ordinariness around food: partners' experienceies of everyday life with a dying person.2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, p. 2748-2756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To explore partners’ experiences of everyday life in caring for a dying person with eating deficiencies at home.

    Background: When a dying person receives care at home, eating deficiencies can influence everyday life for family members, who often take responsibility for the provision of food and meals. The literature reveals this to be emotionally stressful. Partners of dying persons are challenged both as caregivers and as partners who will soon lose their life companion. There is a need for studies that provide enhanced understanding about the influence of dying persons’ eating deficiencies on their partners, from the perspective of everyday life.

    Design: A qualitative design was chosen to obtain experience-based knowledge of relevance for the clinical context of palliative home care.

    Methods: Nine people were purposefully selected and interviewed three–six months after the death of their partner. Data collection and analysis were guided by an interpretive descriptive method.

    Results: The partners described experiences of how eating deficiencies brought about changes in the participants’ everyday lives. Two patterns of experiences were identified: the challenge of doing the best for their dying partner around matters involving food and mealtimes, and experiences of striving to maintain ordinariness, including holding on to social values around food, despite experiences of unfamiliarity when the dying partners’ habits were changed.

    Conclusion:Living close to a person who has eating deficiencies at the end of life is challenging, both from a caring perspective and for personal well-being.

    Relevance to clinical practice: The findings can assist palliative home care teams and other healthcare professionals to give support that goes beyond giving practical advice about food. Initiating talk about the current situation around food and meals at home, by posing questions and opening the way for conversations, is suggested.

  • 16.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Carlander (Goliath), Ida
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Henriksson (Alvariza), Anette
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Factors Associated with Feelings of Reward during Ongoing Palliative Family Caregiving2014In: Palliative Medicine, Sage Publications, 2014, p. 699-699Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Of the few studies that have paid attention to feelings of reward in palliative family caregiving, most are retrospective and examine the experiences of bereaved family caregivers. Although feeling rewarded has been described as an influence that may facilitate the way family caregivers handle the caregiving situation, no study has sought to identify factors associated with feelings of reward while providing ongoing family palliative care. The aim of this study, therefore, was to identify influential factors in feelings of reward in family palliative caregivers. Methods: The study had a correlational cross-sectional design. Family caregivers (n = 125) of patients receiving specialized palliative care were consecutively recruited from four settings. These caregivers answered a questionnaire including the Rewards of Caregiving Scale (RCS). The questionnaire also included questions about demographic background and scales to measure preparedness for caregiving, feelings of hope, perceived health, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with rewards. Results: The results showed that more prepared caregivers with higher levels of hope felt more rewarded, while caregivers with higher levels of anxiety and those in a spousal relationship to the patient felt less rewarded by caregiving. Significance of results: It seems reasonable that feeling rewarded can significant to the overall experience of providing ongoing palliative care. The situation of family caregivers has been shown to be multifaceted and complex, and co-varying factors such as preparedness, anxiety, hope, and being in a spousal relationship with the patient influence the experience.

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