Change search
Refine search result
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Browall, Maria
    et al.
    Pakpour, Amir H
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Short Version of the Swedish Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying Scale.2020In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Frommelt Attitudes Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) is widely used as a measure of attitudes toward care of dying patients. However, poor factor structure and item redundancy have been reported across the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: A short version of the questionnaire is needed, to facilitate effective assessments of the attitudes of those caring for dying patients. The purpose of this study was to develop a FATCOD-Short Form and to secure its psychometric properties.

    INTERVENTIONS/METHODS: Data gathered from 1000 nurses in previous studies were pooled and reanalyzed. Principal components analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were utilized to assess the factor structure of the FATCOD-30. A Rasch model was used to evaluate the measurement functioning of the scale.

    RESULTS: Of the original 30 items, 9 items of FATCOD were chosen for retention in the short form based on the principal components analysis, floor or ceiling effects, interitem correlations, and item-total correlation. All 9 items had good internal reliability. Both confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis supported the unidimensionality of the FATCOD-Short Form.

    CONCLUSIONS: The 9-item FATCOD-Short Form demonstrates evidence of acceptable validity and reliability to identify nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons because of its brevity and comprehensive content.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: When changing curricula in nursing education or implementing new procedures in nursing practice, it is important to have valid instruments to evaluate the results of the change. Such instruments should not be too lengthy or complicated. FATCOD-Short Form is a brief and valid instrument that can be easily used.

  • 2.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Westin, Lars
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Strang, Susann
    Göteborgs universitet & Angereds Närsjukhus.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC. Angereds Närsjukhus & Göteborgs universitet.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Death and caring for dying patients: exploring first-year students´descriptive experiences2014In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 509-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe first-year nursing students' experiences of witnessing death and providing end-of-life care.

    Methods: This study is part of a larger longitudinal project. Interviews (n=17) were conducted with nursing students at the end of their first year of education. To analyse the interviews (lived-experience descriptions), a thematic analysis, ‘a search for meaning’ (Van Manen, 1997) was applied.

    Results: The results are presented within the framework of four separate themes: (1) The thought of death is more frightening than the actual experience, (2) Daring to approach the dying patient and offering something of oneself, (3) The experience of not sufficing in the face of death and (4) Being confronted with one's own feelings.

    Conclusion: Nursing students require continuous support and opportunity to reflect and discuss their experiences about caring for dying patients and confronting death throughout the entirety of their education. In addition, teachers and clinical supervisors need to give support using reflective practice to help students to develop confidence in their capacity for caring for dying patients.

  • 3.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Angereds närsjukhus.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Göteborgs universitet, Mittuniversitetet.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Strang, Susann
    Göteborgs universitet, Angereds närsjukhus.
    Ek, Kristina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmets högskola, Stockholms sjukhem, Karolinska institutet.
    Westin, Lars
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Ersta sjukhus.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Karolinska institutet.
    Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons: A longitudinal study2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 26, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.

  • 4.
    Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Angereds närsjukhus.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Development of the 6S Dialogue Tool to facilitate person-centred palliative care.2019In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 75, p. 3138-3146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To develop and psychometrically test the 6S Dialogue Tool.

    BACKGROUND: The 6S Dialogue Tool was elaborated to provide knowledge to nurses about patients' preferences in congruence with the 6S person-centred palliative care model, which includes the S-concepts of self-image, symptom relief, self-determination, social relationships, synthesis and strategies. The tool needs to be scrutinized for appropriateness.

    DESIGN: A qualitative study investigating construct validity of the 6S Dialogue Tool.

    METHODS: Forty-six patients in palliative care services in Sweden responded to 15 questions from May 2015 - August 2016. Responses were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Six categories, capturing the meaning of the 6S-concepts, were formulated: Maintaining everyday life; Challenges in everyday life; Maintaining control; Maintaining selected relationships; Appraisal of life; and Appraisal of the future.

    CONCLUSION: The responses to the 6S Dialogue Tool questions reflect the intent of the 6S-concepts. Nurses should integrate the 6S-concepts and the questions in their approach to facilitate to co-create meaningful palliative care in dialogue with the patient.

    IMPACT: Patients' preferences must be explored to co-create palliative care in accordance with their own needs and beliefs. The 6S Dialogue Tool questions are suitable for obtaining patients' preferences and could be used as an approach in palliative care. Patients, families and nurses will have the potential to co-create palliative care and to improve possibilities for patients to have an appropriate death.

  • 5.
    Holmberg, Bodil
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Linköpings universitet.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Umeå universitet.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Assenting to exposedness - meanings of receiving assisted bodily care in a nursing home as narrated by older persons.2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most older persons moving to a nursing home need to receive assisted bodily care, which means being in a position of vulnerability. However, few studies have explicitly focused on the meanings of receiving assisted bodily care from the older persons' perspective. This study aimed to elucidate meanings of receiving assisted bodily care, as narrated by older persons living in a nursing home. Twelve men and women, aged 80 or older, living in a Swedish nursing home, participated in the study. Data were generated by narrative interviews and analysed with a phenomenological-hermeneutical method. The regional ethics committee approved the study. In the analysis, one main theme emerged: 'Assenting to exposedness'. This theme comprised five themes, 'To have hope in hopelessness', 'To relinquish one's body into others' hands', 'To be between power and powerlessness', 'To oscillate between one's own responsibility and demands', 'To be in an ongoing interaction', and ten subthemes. In conclusion, receiving assisted bodily care means to be exposed, but not passively. Rather, it means to be self-determinant for as long as possible, to perceive the body as lived. When the body must be relinquished to others, it might be objectified, leading to care-suffering. To avoid this, the older persons use a certain competence, acquired through life, to decide when to take action or when to assent. However, this is but one of the several possible interpretations, which may be considered a limitation.

  • 6.
    Holmberg, Bodil
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Linköpings universitet.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Being a Companion at a Natural Pathway towards Death2017In: EAPC 2017: 15th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care. Progressing Palliative Care, Milano: EAPC , 2017, p. 1091-1091, article id P02-436Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dying in old age tends to be slow and characterized by frailty and bodily needs. In Sweden a large proportion of deaths occur in nursing homes where bodily care is foremost provided by assistant nurses (ANs) who have high school education. Due to lack of places, admission to a nursing home is seldom granted until the older person has complex care needs, meeting death within a year.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe ANs experiences of providing bodily care to older persons during the last time of their lives in a nursing home.

    Method: The study had a qualitative design. Data was collected by individual interviews with ANs (n=7). The transcribed interviews were analyzed using an inductive qualitative content analysis.

    Results: In the analysis one main theme emerged; “Being a companion at a natural pathway towards death”. The ANs perceived dying at old age expected as a natural end to a long life. This meant not to hinder what happened, but to be pliable to bodily signs of gradual deterioration of the older person, using intuition, experience and teamwork. The bodily care strived to relieve oppressive symptoms and increase quality of life. This was made possible by teamwork with a holistic approach meaning that bodily care was not only to care for the body, but the whole person. Thus, ANs also described a wish to bring a sense of security and well-being to the older person by being present, creating an atmosphere of closeness outgoing from a companionship built upon a mutual and familiar relationship. 

    Conclusion: ANs strived to supply a bodily care aimed to strengthen the older persons self-image. This goal was closely linked to a person-centred palliative care that highlights self-image as fundamental to health, wellbeing and a good death. This may indicate a need of further education in palliative care in order to strengthen the ANs as professionals but also to develop an evidence-based bodily care.

  • 7.
    Holmberg, Bodil
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Linköpings universitet.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    End-of-life care in a nursing home: Assistant nurses' perspectives.2018In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, article id 969733018779199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Worldwide, older persons lack access to palliative care. In Sweden, many older persons die in nursing homes where care is provided foremost by assistant nurses. Due to a lack of beds, admission is seldom granted until the older persons have complex care needs and are already in a palliative phase when they move in.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe assistant nurses' perspectives of providing care to older persons at the end of life in a nursing home.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: Data were collected in semi-structured individual interviews and analyzed with inductive qualitative content analysis. Participants and research context: Seven assistant nurses from a nursing home in Sweden were randomly selected. Ethical consideration: The research was approved by the local ethics committee.

    RESULTS: Three main categories emerged; "Death a natural part of life"; "The older person's well-being"; and "Care in the moment of death"; and seven sub-categories. The assistant nurses described themselves as knowing the older persons well enough to provide good end-of-life care. This was achieved by making small-talk while providing daily care. Relying on experience-based knowledge, they strove to provide end-of-life care built upon respect and engagement with the ambition to strengthen older persons' dignity, for example, by lowering the tempo of care at the end of life, in spite of organizational restrictions.

    DISCUSSION: The assistant nurses offered attentive end-of-life care, focusing upon bodily care. The existential needs of the older persons were not foregrounded.

    CONCLUSION: To develop their work, and to promote an ethical foundation for such care, assistant nurses might need support and education to be able to offer a care more in line with the aims of palliative care. Furthermore, the organization of care needs to promote, not impede, the realization of this development.

  • 8.
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    et al.
    Sophiahemmets högskola, Stockholms sjukhem, Karolinska institutet.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet, Göteborgs universitet.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet, Angereds närsjukhus, Göteborg.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Ek, Kristina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Strang, Susann
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Westin, Lars
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first- year nursing students2016In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students’ attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated.

    Method: The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used.

    Results: Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude.

    Conclusion: Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students’ attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

  • 9. Melin-Johansson, Christina
    et al.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Ek, Kristina
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Browall, Maria
    Högskolan i Skövde, Jönköping University.
    Undergraduate nursing students' transformational learning during clinical training.2018In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 184-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Undergraduate nursing students encounter patients at the end of life during their clinical training. They need to confront dying and death under supportive circumstances in order to be prepared for similar situations in their future career.

    AIM: To explore undergraduate nursing students' descriptions of caring situations with patients at the end of life during supervised clinical training.

    METHODS: A qualitative study using the critical incident technique was chosen. A total of 85 students wrote a short text about their experiences of caring for patients at the end of life during their clinical training. These critical incident reports were then analysed using deductive and inductive content analysis.

    FINDINGS: The theme 'students' transformational learning towards becoming a professional nurse during clinical training' summarises how students relate to patients and relatives, interpret the transition from life to death, feel when caring for a dead body and learn end-of-life caring actions from their supervisors.

    IMPLICATIONS: As a preparation for their future profession, students undergoing clinical training need to confront death and dying while supported by trained supervisors and must learn how to communicate about end-of-life issues and cope with emotional stress and grief.

  • 10.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Hårsmar, Anna-Lena
    Brickegårdens primärvårdscenter.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Assistant nurses’ descriptions of signs of dying among older people in nursing homes2013In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Seiger- Cronfalk, Berit
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, Stord Haugesund University College, Haugesund, Norway.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Franklin Larsson, Lise-Lotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksen, Eva
    Stockholm County Council, Research and Development FOUnu, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Utilization of palliative care principles in nursing home care: Educational interventions2015In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1745-1753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study is part of the overarching PVIS (Palliative Care in Nursing Homes) project aimed at building competence in palliative care for nursing home staff. Our objective was to describe nursing home staff's attitudes to competence-building programs in palliative care.

    Method: Three different programs were developed by specialist staff from three local palliative care teams. In all, 852 staff at 37 nursing homes in the greater Stockholm area participated. Staff from 7 nursing homes participated in 11 focus-group discussions. Variation in size between the seven nursing homes initiated purposeful selection of staff to take part in the discussions, and descriptive content analysis was used.

    Results: The results suggest that staff reported positive experiences as they gained new knowledge and insight into palliative care. The experiences seemed to be similar independent of the educational program design. Our results also show that staff experienced difficulties in talking about death. Enrolled nurses and care assistants felt that they carried out advanced care without the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge. Further, the results also suggest that lack of support from ward managers and insufficient collaboration and of a common language between different professions caused tension in situations involved in caring for dying people.

    Significance of results: Nursing home staff experienced competence-building programs in palliative care as useful. Even so, further competence is needed, as is long-term implementation strategies and development of broader communication skills among all professions working in nursing homes.

  • 12.
    Steindal, Simen
    et al.
    Norge.
    Österlind, Jane
    Halvorsen, Kristin
    Norge.
    Schjelderup, Therese
    Norge.
    Kive, Ellen
    Norge.
    Wergeland Sörbye, Liv
    Norge.
    Dihle, Alfhild
    Norge.
    A Qualitative study of women´s experiences of living with COPD2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore women’s experiences of living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at home.

    Design: An explorative and descriptive qualitative design.

    Methods: A consecutive sample of nine women with COPD living at home. Data were collected in 2014 using semi-structured interviews and analysed using a qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three main themes were identified: having a good life with COPD despite imitations; predictability and confidence in getting help; and the struggle to achieve a balance between insight and compliance with management of COPD. These women experienced limitations related to the traditional female role and felt unable to fulfil their own expectations. They experienced a good life despite limitations arising from adaptation and coping strategies. To feel safe, they needed to feel confident that they would receive the necessary help in case of exacerbation of their disease. To enhance compliance with COPD management, the women wanted education that provided specific suggestions.

  • 13.
    Strang, Susann
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Berg, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Ek, Kristina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Westin, Lars
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Palliative Reserch Centre, PRC.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Swedish nursing students´ reasoning about emotionally demanding issues in caring for dying patients2014In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 194-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Henoch, IngelaErsta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.Österlind, JaneErsta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.Andershed, BirgittaErsta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    De 6 s:n: en modell för personcentrerad palliativ vård2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    De 6 S:n: En modell för personcentrerad palliativ vård2013In: Palliativ vård: begrepp & perspektiv i teori och praktik / [ed] Andershed, Birgitta, Ternestedt, Britt-Marie, Håkanson, Cecilia, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, 1, p. 475-489Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet,institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    De 6 S:n - En modell för personcentrerad palliativ vård2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Hemmet på hemmet: att vårdas och vårda inom särskilda boendeformer för äldre. En beskrivning om livets sista tid på sjukhem och ålderdomshem ur ett personalperspektiv2002Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    När livsrummet krymper: vård och omsorg av äldre personer i livets slutskede2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research focused on the life situation of older people, who had moved to a nursing home at the end of life, from the perspectives of the older people themselves, care managers and nursing staff. The thesis is based on an analysis of 446 care manager assessments and decisions, interviews with seven care managers, six older people and 28 nursing staff. The main fi ndings are: (I); that there was a statistically signifi cantly shorter waiting time for a move to a nursing home for older people who were in hospital compared to those who were living in their own home at the time of the decision. Seventy percent of the decisions made by care managers’ concerned women. The waiting period for men was fi ve days shorter compared to women. (II); that the care managers’ descriptions revealed that their assessments of the needs and wishes of the older people were infl uenced by whether or not it was clear that the older person had only a limited time left to live. The care managers’ way of reasoning has been conceptualised as two approaches, the medical and the natural path to death, where the former was characterised as fl exible and collaborative, whereas the latter was governed to a greater extent by a “wait and see attitude”. (III); that the older people’s experiences of living in a nursing home have been conceptualised into three themes: feeling like a stranger in an unfamiliar culture, being excluded from life, and living while waiting for death. The latter involved a deep insight that life would soon come to an end; a fact the staff appeared to take into account to only a minor extent. (IV); that dying and death was characterised by a discourse of silence, with tension between avoidance of and a confrontation with death. Staff members who expressed a fear of death held it at a distance by concentrating on practical tasks and avoiding close contact with older people who were dying. The thesis highlights the fact that the dying and death of older persons was characterised by a discourse of silence and several transitions. Death was not a topic that the staff members or older people generally talked about, and care in the fi nal phase of life was not actively or explicitly planned. In terms of access to a nursing home bed, only older people with an extensive need for care obtained such a place. These fi ndings imply that all older people can be said to be in need of palliative care. The older people in our study were in a liminal phase, and waiting for death. Feelings of social and existential loneliness and that their living space was shrinking were evident. It was also clear that the older people and staff members inhabit the same place but appear to be in two different sub-cultures, where the norms and values that guided the staff members’ attitudes were dominant. Keywords: transition, older people, end of life care, palliative care, nursing home, caring, care manager and staff

  • 19.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Omvårdnadsbehov i livets slutskede2001In: Palliativ vård / [ed] Inger Fridegren, Susanne Lyckander, Stockholm: Liber, 2001, 1, p. 92-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Vårdkultur och självbestämmande i sjukhemsmiljö2007In: Hemmets vårdetik: om vård av äldre i livets slutskede / [ed] Gunilla Silfverberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, p. 235-247Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Österlind, Jane
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Andersson, Janicke
    Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, LInköpings universitet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Linköpings universitet.
    A discourse of silence: professional carers resoning of death and dying in nursing homes2011In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 529-544Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nursing homes are a setting in which death and dying is common. How death and dying is articulated and the actions that take place in a nursing home constitute adiscourse that guides the staff in their work. The aim of this studywas to explore thediscourse of death and dying in nursing homes from the perspective and understandingof the staff. The study draws on Foucault’s discourse analysis. Data arefrom fivefocus-group discussions held with 28 staff of four different nursing homes in Sweden. The findings show that the discourse had three characteristics :(a) dying was silent and silenced, (b) emotions were pushed into the background,and (c) attentiveness to death arose after the moment of the elderly person’s death. The structure of the discourse was characterised by a movement between twopositions, avoiding and confronting death, themain focus being on avoidance. Thearticulation and practices of silence highlight a need to regard dying as a processthat requires attention. One way to ensure appropriate attention could be to instil the philosophy of palliative care in nursing homes, including training and supportfor the staff in their work. The study demonstrates that nursing-home staff needmore knowledge and support to enable them to feel that they do a good job.

  • 22.
    Österlind, Jane
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Lantz, Göran
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård.
    Pathways in end-of-life care for older people: care managers' reasoning.2008In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 420-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seven care managers employed by a large municipality in Sweden were interviewed concerning their reasoning regarding end-of-life care for older people. Data were analyzed using a hermeneutic approach. The results showed that end-of-life care was considered to constitute a small part of the care managers' work and was something they did not focus on in general when assessing care needs. Two different pathways to death--the natural and the medical--were identified. In the natural pathway, death was invisible and the care was more routine-oriented. In the medical pathway, death was visualised and the care more individualised. Neither of the pathways paid attention to communication or existential needs. Thus, there is a need for a palliative pathway to death based on the philosophy of palliative care, which could provide guidance for care managers and promote opportunities for older people to achieve a dignified dying and death.

  • 23.
    Österlind, Jane
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Rikard
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research.
    Moving on a roundabout at the end of life-What counts? Waiting times for transfer to sheltered accommodation for older people in Sweden.2009In: Health Policy, ISSN 0168-8510, E-ISSN 1872-6054, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 183-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, increased care in ordinary housing has contributed to a reduction of rooms in sheltered accommodation. The allocation of rooms has become stricter. Only those whose care needs cannot be met in any other ways are allocated such accommodation. The aim was to explore the waiting time between the transfer decision and the accomplishment of the move from the initial form of care to sheltered accommodation as well as whether there were differences in waiting time in relation to certain demographic data. METHOD: 445 decision documents were analysed. Mean and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for waiting time and date of the move to sheltered accommodation were calculated. Differences between mean age and waiting time were analysed using Student's T-test. Effects of age, gender and cohabitation on waiting time were estimated by means of multifactor linear regression. RESULTS: The main finding was that the difference in mean waiting time was shortest when moving from hospital, irrespective of destination. There were no significant differences in waiting time in relation to gender, age or cohabitation. CONCLUSION: The reason for a move was often described by means of abstract standard formulations. There is a need for standardised models and assessment instruments in order to ensure older people's safety and to compare different forms of accommodation.

  • 24.
    Österlind, Jane
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Prahl, Charlotte
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC.
    Westin, Lars
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Strang, Susann
    Göteborgs universitet, Angereds närsjukhus.
    Bergh, Ingrid
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, PRC. Angereds närsjukhus, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hammarlund, Kina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Ek, Kristina
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school.2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 41, p. 12-16, article id S0260-6917(16)00122-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe Swedish nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people after the first year of a three year in a nursing programme at three university nursing schools in Sweden.

    METHODS: Interviews (n=17) were undertaken with nursing students at the end of their first year. A phenomenographic approach was used to design and structure the analysis of the nursing students' perceptions.

    RESULTS: The analysis resulted in five categories: 1) from abstract to reality, 2) from scary to natural, 3) increased knowledge can give bad conscience, 4) time limits versus fear of end-of-life conversations, and 5) meeting with relatives.

    CONCLUSION: Nursing students need to be prepared both theoretically and within practice to encounter death and dying and to care for dying persons. By combining their theoretical knowledge of dying and death with their own encounters of death and dying people in practice, the students can be supported to develop an understanding of dying and death as a natural part of life rather than something frightening.

  • 25.
    Österlind, Jane
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård. Karolinska institutet.
    Hansebo, Görel
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of palliative care research. Ersta Sköndal University College, Department of Health Care Sciences. Linköpings universitet.
    Feeling lonely in an unfamiliar place: older peoples experiences of life close to death in a nursing home2017In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-8, article id e12129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of how older persons living in a nursing home experience life close to death.

    Background: A move to and a life in a nursing home while being close to death is a reality for many older people in Sweden. Being able to express thoughts and feelings about death has been described as both crucial for sustaining personhood as well as for establishing a meaningful existence at the end of life. Important are the experiences of older people living in nursing homes who are approaching death.

    Method: Six older people were interviewed on one to four occasions. A total of 16 interviews were conducted with the participants. An interpretative approach was chosen.

    Findings: The main interpretation, Feeling lonely in an unfamiliar place, is based on three themes (i) Waiting for death, with the subthemes death as a release and thinking of oneself as dead; (ii) Subordinate oneself to values and norms of the staff, with the subthemes feeling offended and feeling trapped; and (iii) Keep the courage up. The older people's lives were characterised by feelings of aloneness in an unfamiliar place which contributed to a sense of existential loneliness. They experienced few opportunities to discuss their thoughts of life and death, including preparations for passing away.

    Conclusion and implication for practice: It is of importance for professionals to be able to meet older people as they are and respect them as human beings in their transitions, before, during and after the move to a nursing home. It is important to find ways to support older people's wellbeing and identity near death.

1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf